MH 370 went missing at 1:30 am or 2:40 am?

March 10, 2014 at 4:10 am 75 comments

En Ahmad Jauhari making his first announcement at 12 noon on 8-3-2014. En Ahmad Jauhari making his first announcement at 12 noon on 8-3-2014. 2nd left: Datuk Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, DCA Chief, Dr Hugh Dunleavy, Director of Commercial MAS.

It took MAS 10 hours to hold a press conference to announce that MH 370 was missing.  MAS could have easily ascertained the status of MH 370 when it did not arrive in Beijing at 6:30 am 8-3-2014 as scheduled.  Further, MH 730 has fuel to fly up to about 8:30 am.  By 9:00 am MAS should have been able to make a public announcement that MH 370 was missing but MAS chose to drag its feet until 12 noon.

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75 Comments Add your own

  • 1. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 6:02 am

    The pilot has a Boeing 777 simulation at his home. I suggest the authorities to look into the simulation. If the theory of pilot suicide is true, he could have simulated the crash.

    I apologize again, but we have to look at all angles.

    Reply
    • 2. Mohd Azman Aris  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:55 am

      To be fair to MAS, I came to know about this tragedy at around 9am while watching Astroawani. The MAS conference was first scheduled for 1030am but was delayed till 12 noon. I actually waited for that 1030am conference. Go check with Astroawani.

      Reply
    • 3. rambo  |  March 10, 2014 at 3:04 pm

      What a stupid assumption…you don’t need a simulator to ‘train’/simulate a suicide act…just pilot it to the sea will do…

      Reply
  • 4. King Kong Kang Kung  |  March 10, 2014 at 7:10 am

    This entry could have been written an hour after MAS failed to make the press statement on the day of the crash but Helen Ang took more than 48 hours to publish and as usual make MAS look back.

    Reply
    • 5. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 8:44 am

      re: “This entry could have been written an hour after MAS failed to make the press statement on the day of the crash”

      Betul lah you ni kangkung. Bagaimana boleh pula Helen Ang akan mengetahui akan perkara ni “an hour after MAS failed to make the press statement”?

      Reply
    • 6. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:16 am

      First, the piece above is not from Helen’s but from Wee Choo Keong.

      And second I don’t understand what you mean by make MAS look back?

      Reply
  • 7. kojen  |  March 10, 2014 at 8:08 am

    Helen….

    tak logik semua sistem keselamatan canggih yg ada pada pesawat gagal berfungsi sepenuhnya unless sengaja dimatikan dari dalam pesawat..

    pilot adalah yg terbaik dalam kelasnya bersama 18k jam penerbangan ….even dia berpatah balik gagal dikesan dca.. hanya radar tentera yang dapàt detect kelakuan pilot tersebut tetapi tanpa tahu motifnya

    tidakkah kita pelik? pelik bukan? sebenarnya it’s planned suicide mission pilot.. maaf kasar bunyinya..

    Cuba buka fb pilot tersebut.. kita pasti dapat rasakan ada sesuatu yg tak kena dengan tindakan adhoc pilot tsb

    thanks Helen from ur pembaca tegar..
    think outside the box

    Reply
    • 8. RINA  |  March 10, 2014 at 8:46 am

      Jgn terlalu cepat jump to conclusion..

      The pilot too have family members, as anxious and probably grieving right now… jgn beri tekanan yg tak bertanggung-jawab.

      Reply
    • 9. Tokngah  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:57 am

      Kalau juruterbang nak bunuh diri, tentu co-pilot akan halang.

      Reply
      • 10. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:25 am

        Yes. That what it should be. We don’t know anything until we found the black box.

        In the case of EgyptAir, the NTSB found that the pilot and co-pilot were struggling over the control and one of the pilots attempted to crash the plane.

        I hope this is not the case.

        Reply
  • 11. Orangkampung  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:20 am

    I don’t think it’s a matter of dragging its feet. I’m sure they have standard SOP on what to do if a plane goes missing. MAS did send out a press release much earlier.

    If i’m not mistaken AJ did say in one of the press conferences that they had followed procedure. They contacted Vietnam, China to track the plane. They contacted next of kin. I think if I have family on board I would appreciate the phone call rather than hear about it on air. And I believe the next of kin in Malaysia at least were already informed before MAS made the PC.

    Reply
  • 12. fad  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:21 am

    Just to share..based pada pe yg data baca dr web dlm n luar negara sebenarnya last contact dgn subang adalah at 0130am.. tapi bila dah tak dapat contact mas cuba check dgn terminal di ho chi minh, terminal2 dan pesawat2 berdekatan.. bila dah confirm mereka ni pun tak dpt signal dr mh370 baru mas confirm yg ia dh terputus hubungan dgn mh370 ni.

    Bagi saya ia normal.. mcm juga kalau2 case kematian.. bila jantung berhenti doktor akan cuba selamatkan mangsa guna apa cara sekali pun.. bila dh confirm guna semua alatan2 pun xdpt nk selamatkan baru declare sipolan2 meninggal pada jam 10.10mlm.. padahal jantung dia dh berhenti 5minit yg lepas lg.

    Saya faham sume resah.. tap bila di fikirkan betul juga kata H2O (walaupun saya x berapa suka dia) yg the most important thing now is to find the plane.. other element will be analysed after…

    Reply
  • 13. Mohamad Fazil (@cr4zetech)  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:51 am

    Hi Helen,

    Announcement were only made after the next of kin has been informed. In this case more than 80% of the next of kin has been contacted. The earliest next of kin was informed was at 6.30am in the morning.

    Protocol need to be adhered to avoid confusion among the public.

    Reply
    • 14. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 9:56 am

      Thanks Fazil but the question of time (1.30am or 2.40am) of last contact has not been clarified.

      Reply
      • 15. tebing tinggi  |  March 10, 2014 at 1:04 pm

        Helan !, would you inform or announce something that you yourself are not sure of . Remember this involved people life .

        Reply
        • 16. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 1:09 pm

          By protocol the plane is declared “missing” when its time in flight has passed the threshold (the airline knows when the fuel would have run out).

          Declaring the plane “missing” is merely a fact in accordance with procedure. Without fuel, no plane would be able to stay in the air. A missing plane does not automatically signify that its passengers have perished.

          Reply
          • 17. tebing tinggi  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:41 pm

            helen,

            Was that adding extra burden anyway , now the plane is still missing and searching for the plane is the principal priority not dangling with procedure that was over.

            Reply
            • 18. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 3:34 pm

              Do you have any idea when (what time) MAS raised the alert so that other countries could be on the look out?

              If the plane fell into the sea, then the sooner everyone (meaning those agencies and authorities, internationally) that matters would be able to start looking for the wreckage. The earlier it is found, the better the chances of survival for any passengers.

              http://abcnews.go.com/US/high-profile-plane-crashes-high-survival-rates/story?id=19599290

              Reply
              • 19. islam1st  |  March 11, 2014 at 2:26 am

                Somebody on the radio was saying that the search area was at least as vast as Malaysia. How fast is fast enough again?

                Tactful is better than membabi buta. Perhaps they way it is being handled coukd have been improved. But do we seriously think that somebody had started the search past azan Subuh? Come on!

                Reply
                • 20. Helen Ang  |  March 11, 2014 at 2:52 am

                  I’ve been looking at dozens of timelines carried in the media. Below is one http://news.asiaone.com/news/relax/missing-mas-flight-timeline-events:
                  re: “but do we seriously think that somebody had started the search past azan Subuh? Come on!”

                  Plane lost contact at 1.30am. MAS press conference at 12pm.

                  China dispatches two rescue ships to the South China Sea at 1pm.

                  All the timelines are unanimous in mentioning China as being the first to send ships. The took place only 12 hours (11.5 hrs) after the first severance of contact.

                  There is a lapse of half a day between losing contact with the plane and the commencement of search.

                  Reply
                  • 21. islam1st  |  March 11, 2014 at 3:20 am

                    But as you have mentioned on other thread. Aircraft went missing in Malaysia is not something that happens everyday. What more this is unprecedented even by the world standard.

                    But with billions to consultants, I still can’t see why ko PR firm were roped in to handle hundreds of reporters swarming the PC???

                    Reply
                    • 22. Helen Ang  |  March 11, 2014 at 3:36 am

                      I scanned dozens of media to read the Timeline and they all unanimously said the 12-hour gap and that the first rescue ships sent out to search the sea were China’s and later joined by Vietnam’s.

                      Couldn’t the time lag have been shortened?

                    • 23. islam1st  |  March 12, 2014 at 12:18 am

                      Perhaps Helen. Welcometo MalaysiaHelen, I case you havhaven’t already. Hehe..

                  • 24. Orangkampung  |  March 11, 2014 at 6:48 am

                    The first media statement was at 7.24 am local time.

                    A MAS VP was interviewed on CNN at about 9am who said SAR was underway.
                    2nd media statement was at 9.05 am local time where it was stated – Malaysia Airlines is currently working with the authorities who have activated their Search and Rescue team to locate the aircraft. Our team is currently calling the next-of-kin of passengers and crew.

                    I guess when everything’s settled we will know for sure when MMEA or whatever authority was first mobilised and what they mean when they say SAR was activated in the statements.

                    Reply
                    • 25. Helen Ang  |  March 11, 2014 at 8:47 am

                      Okay.

      • 26. Mohamad Fazil (@cr4zetech)  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:00 pm

        1.30 is the last contact made between ATC in Subang and the pilot. This supposedly to inform the pilot the handover to ATC in Ho Chin Minh city. However there is no communication between Ho Chin Minh City ATC and the pilot. Vietnamese ATC informed hand over back to ATC Subang. Atttempts being made to contact and locate MH370 through various channel including contacting the neighbouring country, SIngapore. AIrcrafts and vessels plying the areas were also notified.

        2.40am. After failing to locate the aircraft, DCA amd MKN are informed. S&R plan activated by DCA.

        Reply
        • 27. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:02 pm

          Thanks.

          Reply
    • 28. idris md isa  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:18 am

      u r right fazil & fad… don’t start the blame game yet & pls refrain from speculating, no matter how strong your suspicion/s is/are. respect the victims & their kins. tunggu la sampai semua confirmed & settle dulu.

      BTW, your first commenter above said the pillot has a boeing 777 “simulation” at home. I thinks he meant “simulator”. But does he know how much a simulator costs? gaji seumur hidup pilot tu + a few 4D 1st prizes pun tak cukup nak beli even a 2nd hand simulator.

      Reply
    • 30. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:20 am

      PROTOCOL

      One hour past overdue for arrival or at such time as the aircraft’s fuel supply
      is projected to be exhausted, which ever is shorter (not to exceed one hour), the
      aircraft shall be declared ‘Missing’.

      MH370 is still missing and not yet considered to have crashed.

      I can understand if notification of next of kin is prioritized in case of air crashes. However even to date, the next of kin are still unable to be notified of anything concrete.

      If the plane is going to run out of fuel at xyz time, then that’s a fact that is known (i.e. industry knowledge that can be calculated by those in the know or with some familiarity with aviation practices).

      Reply
      • 31. mfma  |  March 10, 2014 at 12:23 pm

        Even if the time MS370 suppose to run out of fuel is known, what happened to MS370 is still unknown.

        What they should inform them then?

        The aircraft crash?

        The aircraft crash-land?

        Reply
        • 32. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 12:38 pm

          As per the airline practice, “missing”.

          Reply
          • 33. Mohamad Fazil (@cr4zetech)  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:04 pm

            the aircraft status will remain forever as missing until the plane has been found or hard evidence can pinpoint the actual status. This is the standard procedure,

            Reply
  • 34. Pedang  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:04 am

    Mungkin jin sorokkan pesawat.

    Reply
    • 35. Setem  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:10 am

      must be one super duper strong and big jin!

      cut the crap laa…

      Reply
      • 36. islam1st  |  March 11, 2014 at 2:30 am

        Pedang kut yang sorokkan pesawat tu???

        Reply
  • 37. terimakasih  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:30 am

    orang islam diharamkan melaku perbuatan bunuh diri.

    setiap yang berlaku ada hikmahnya.

    dalam kes ini apa yang diperlukan sekarang adalah menyelamatkan mereka dan bagi yang tak terlibat berdoalah untuk mereka agar mereka selamat.

    Reply
  • 38. maehwang  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:33 am

    I think we can safely rule out suicidal pilots. Come on. As Muslims, why would you want to kill everybody on board? If you want to kill yourself, you don’t have to bring 228 people along with you. That is like double the sins. And I am saying this from a Non-Muslim point of view. My Muslim friends have impressed on me how bad the dosa is if a Muslim takes on suicide.

    Judging from the information we have thus far, metal fatigue could be a more probable cause and this resulted in a mid-air explotion due to explosive decompression.

    I shall accept what MAS and the Government has to say about MH370. In times like this, I don’t think they would want to hide anything. Not when the whole world is watching. Any stupid comments like the Government ochestrated this because of AI is pure hogwash. We are talking about lives here. 229 of them. And majority of them are PRC.

    The time of the last contact is secondary. Right now, I don’t blame them if their main mission is to find MH370.

    Prayers for MH 370.

    Reply
    • 39. Orangkampung  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:04 am

      Even if you take religion out of the equation, I believe it’s not suicide. Look at the info shared online of the Capt – he seems to be a very put-together guy who looked like he’s enjoying his life. I read on CNN that the first officer was enthusiastic about transitioning to the 747-200 (interviewed by CNN’s Quest for a report). Doesn’t sound like people who have given up on life.

      http://edition.cnn.com/2014/03/08/world/asia/malaysia-airlines-first-officer/index.html

      Reply
    • 40. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:26 am

      I know. It is the worst possible cause. I hope it is not.
      Muslims do commit death their own if they think it is a jihad.
      Think about the EgyptAir pilot. He was a Muslim too. People said he committed suicide but the Egyptian government denied this.

      Reply
      • 41. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:30 am

        re: “People said he committed suicide but the Egyptian government denied this.”

        People repeat things that are untrue. Look at the Dapsters.

        Reply
        • 42. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:32 am

          The Egyptian government denied, but there is evidence from US NTSB that the pilot deliberately crashed the plane.

          Reply
          • 43. islam1st  |  March 11, 2014 at 2:38 am

            ‘Muslims do commit death their own…(for) jihad’

            Welcome back zack. Lama baling batu sembunyi tangan nampak!

            Reply
    • 44. An Unimportant Person  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:57 am

      maehwang,

      “…As Muslims, why would you want to kill everybody on board?…”

      Please don’t be naive.

      The blood of kafirs is halal under the warped intepretation of some people who call themselves Muslims, eg a kafir harbi.

      How else would you explain all those suicide killings in the name of Islam?

      I hasten to add that I do not believe for one nanosecond that Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah or his co-pilot, Fariq Abdul Hamid, are in ANY way responsible. From what I have read about them, they loved their work 110%.

      Much of international speculation is now gravitating towards a terrorist attack related to Xinjiang separatists. I want to stress that it is merely speculative comment in the public domain by various commentators with no actual evidence.

      Unfortunately, I had made the same analysis when I heard of the stolen passports but I said nothing because nobody else was saying it.

      If it is Xinjiang separatists, I have a feeling that the political ambitions of those separatists will be sidelined whilst everybody just concentrates on the Islamist component of the separatists!

      Reply
      • 45. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 12:40 pm

        Google: A good number of the Uighur people in China look white. So they can pass off at a glance on Italian or Austrian passport.

        Reply
      • 46. zack  |  March 10, 2014 at 1:24 pm

        It could be just a pilot error.

        Reply
      • 47. Curmudgeon of 72  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:05 pm

        AUP, that is a strong possibility. But if that is the case, wouldn’t there be a hostage demand or some group claiming responsibility by now?

        Unless all this is being negotiated behaviour closed doors for security reasons.

        Anyway, just hope for the best.

        Reply
        • 48. Curmudgeon of 72  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:08 pm

          Sorry *behind closed doors

          Reply
      • 49. Din  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:16 pm

        nil

        Reply
      • 50. Din  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:17 pm

        An Unimportant Person,

        Apa benda yang ko tak paham dengan komen maehwang tu?
        Bila dia cakap ‘As a Muslim’ dia cakap pasal pilot la. Ko yang buntut gatal nak sentuh pasal kafir harbi, nak bunuh….eh kalau la Melayu memang cam Muslim yang ko cap tu, dah lama ko mampus tau. Tak ada peluang pun untuk type komen bodoh ko tu. Jangan ingat kita orang Melayu tak pandai baca double meaning ko tu.

        Reply
        • 51. An Unimportant Person  |  March 10, 2014 at 11:51 pm

          Din,

          “Double meaning” ? What “double meaning” ?

          That some people who call themselves Muslims will happily kill you if they consider you a kafir harbi?

          I thought it was quite clear.

          I also thought it was equally clear that I cannot believe Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah or his co-pilot, Fariq Abdul Hamid, simply COULD NOT have done anything wrong.

          It’s OK, I do understand that you may have some difficulties with the English language.

          Reply
          • 52. islam1st  |  March 11, 2014 at 2:43 am

            But we do understand why, instead of a kafir harbi, you chose to highlight it as any kafirs, halal darah. Sneaky gunting dslam lipatan. AUP, don’t brag, english ko pun tak lah sofistikated mana! Sebab tu kut sesetengah orang tak berapa nak faham!

            Paham?

            Reply
  • 53. azre  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:41 am

    Not really. Official yes. Unofficial no. I read bbc n utusan both online at 9 am and they hv news flash on that. By 1 pm everyone was talking abt it. So slow everyone hehehe

    Reply
    • 54. azre  |  March 10, 2014 at 10:45 am

      Sorry not utusan but nst my apology

      Reply
  • 55. Crankshaft  |  March 10, 2014 at 2:42 pm

    They lost contact at 1:30 but only raised the alert at 2:40AM. They probably thought it was just a case of faulty avionics or black zone (where there is no transmission coverage). If there was a technical issue, the pilot would have raised a Mayday, but he didn’t. The aviation world is flummoxed.

    Reply
  • 56. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 3:38 pm

    Helen,

    I initially didn’t want to comment as I’m a concerned party but to answer your main point of contention, the very first release was actually sent out at 7:24am on the day itself.

    So, to say MAS didn’t act according to protocol is untrue, misleading, and a tad bit accusatory.

    I will try to answer as much as I can, should y’all have any queries, but please bear in mind that I can’t go beyond what protocol dictates in such circumstances.

    Reply
    • 57. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 3:44 pm

      re: “a tad bit accusatory”

      I have this niggling feeling that MAS wasn’t up to speed. Or maybe the airline did follow procedure and protocol but its public relations department is not doing a good job of communicating to reporters.

      Reply
      • 58. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:03 pm

        In all fairness, as soon it was confirmed that there was a problem, per protocol, MAS acted how it’s supposed to be.

        I’m not trying to offer any excuse but the PC was delayed not because of MAS, but the other agencies, as some of them were away from KL when it happened.

        As to non-divulgence of information to the press, again per priotocol, MAS has been forthcoming with what it could divulge.

        Reply
      • 59. Mohamad Fazil (@cr4zetech)  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:11 pm

        I agree with Sabahan18…. just wanna add, MAS can only responds to its area of responsibility, i.e. the passenger and next of kin. MAS has no jurisdiction on S&R. This lie directly under DCA jurisdiction.

        Reply
        • 60. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:24 pm

          What will usually happen after MAS informs DCA? What did DCA do? Just asking b’cos an air’crash’ is not something that happens every day, particularly involving MAS, so not many people (including me) aware.

          Normally I get annoyed with Malaysian media and the way they report. If I blog, it’s to complain about the standard of reporting.

          Reply
          • 61. Mohamad Fazil (@cr4zetech)  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:31 pm

            MAS will only assist DCA by providing access to all information required. DCA has the legal authority in such situation and DCA lead the investigation of any aviation matter in the country. This covered and provided by the Aviation Act.

            Reply
            • 62. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:34 pm

              In guess in this case of MH370 the bloggers are both — some memberi pencerahan while some mengeruhkan suasana. I’m willing to be educated, so thanks again.

              Reply
            • 63. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:42 pm

              Totally spot on.

              In this kind of incidence, the DCA takes lead as the main body to get to the root of this tragic incident. This is the reason why the DCA boss is the main person during PC’s.

              Reply
      • 64. Orangkampung  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:35 pm

        Been following this closely. Curiousity, need to know, a friend of the family on board. So I believe YES, MAS and m’sian authorities are doing a good job under the worst circumstances. BUT perceptions of their efforts are bad, really bad and being promoted as bad by unfriendly local media.

        Hishamuddin just finished a media conference on MH370 on TV and I gotta say he’s coming across as the man-in-charge, sharp, confident and in control.

        Reply
        • 65. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:38 pm

          re: “he’s coming across as the man-in-charge, sharp, confident and in control”

          An improvement over Lahad Datu, then.

          Reply
          • 66. Setem  |  March 10, 2014 at 7:06 pm

            internal UMNO rumours have it that Hishammudin was told that this was an opportunity to redeem himself to the Msian public as a trustworthy and credible public figure, after the PR disaster he encountered over Lahad Datu.

            Reply
        • 67. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:45 pm

          Perception is fueled by the biased and inaccurate media reporting.

          As mentioned above, MAS has done a superb job in doing what an airline is supposed to do in such circumstances. What people are asking are not with MAS scope of responsibility.

          Reply
          • 68. Helen Ang  |  March 10, 2014 at 4:57 pm

            Perception bad not only locally but in China and in Vietnam.

            The Global Times, a tabloid under the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily, said in a tersely worded editorial on Monday that “the Malaysian side cannot shirk its responsibilities”.

            “Until yesterday, it could not even ensure accurate information about the passengers. The initial response from Malaysia was not swift enough. There are loopholes in the work of Malaysia Airlines and security authorities,” it wrote.

            http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/se-asia/story/missing-malaysia-airlines-plane-chinese-media-attack-mas-and-malaysia-go

            “UPDATE [11:00pm]: Vietnamese media is quoting search and rescue officials as being ‘surprised’ at how tight-lipped the Malaysian government is. According to VN Express, Vietnam’s Chief of Air Administration Lai Xuan Thanh says they are receiving very little information from Malaysian partners, with most updates coming from international media.”

            http://my.news.yahoo.com/mas-aircraft-goes-missing–says-airline-023820132.html

            Reply
            • 69. Orangkampung  |  March 10, 2014 at 5:22 pm

              I think everyone was tight-lipped because no one knew what happened to the plane. They can’t say it’s crashed because no evidence, so they just kept repeating that the plane is missing and informed they’re doing everything including requesting for help from M’sia’s neighbours. And they can only repeat where the plane was last seen on radar. And people were not happy with the answers or non-answers.

              Reply
              • 70. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 5:38 pm

                Crisis Management 101: Only say something if you have something to say.

                Unlike those commenting on social media and those asking questions, MAS and the DCA have the responsibility to make sure that everything they say have been verified and certified.

                One of the biggest complains from China is that some of them found out through unofficial means about the fate of their families/friends.

                The thing though, because of social media, the manifest was leaked before MAS managed to inform the families of everyone in the list.

                Reply
            • 71. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 5:25 pm

              I’m not saying it isn’t but look at the contents of those articles carefully – Vietnamese media is quoting search and rescue officials”, really?

              C’mon Helen, you’re a seasoned journalist; and the supposed quote from that Lai Xuan had been denied by him and the Vietnamese government themselves.

              As for the one in China, it’s directed more at the Malaysian gov’t, not MAS.

              Having said that, all I can say at this time is that they are nothing but preemptive strikes because when the dust settles and the truth is known, the world will know China is not the most truthful government in the world.

              You get what I’m saying?

              Reply
              • 72. Setem  |  March 10, 2014 at 7:09 pm

                I feel what you’ve said, Sabahan18. You’re right there.

                Reply
            • 73. Sabahan18  |  March 10, 2014 at 5:27 pm

              Just to add, the world at large, minus China and the media, who are helping us find the MH370 have nothing but good words for the efforts and steps the government, MAS, DCA, etc have taken.

              Reply
              • 74. Setem  |  March 10, 2014 at 7:13 pm

                I have a feeling that the ‘overly’ enthusiastic CNN newscasters were disappointed because they only got positive feedbacks from the experts they interviewed about MAS technical capability as a whole.

                The one Msian department that is rightly on the bad spotlight is the Immigration Dpt. Padan muka I would like to scream on the DG of the Immi Dpt. Tidur lagi.

                Reply
  • 75. noorazaman  |  March 10, 2014 at 6:50 pm

    Helen, gerakan mencari di jalankan di atas permukaan laut di laut china selatan serta selat melaka. Tiada laporan mengatakan pencarian dibuat di kawasan di antara laut dan angkasa. Dalam situasi sebeginii sepatutnya mereka yang cerdik akan membuat kesimpulan bahawa pesawat itu berada di permukaan bumi. Senangkan.

    Reply

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