Posted in Evangelista Bintang Tiga

Will Terengganu Islam soon cross the Titiwangsa?

Beginning this year, all supermarkets in Terengganu are required to close for two hours during zohor on Fridays.

Then there is the plan to punish Terengganu men who miss the Friday congregational prayers by parading them in hearses around town.

It was also reported that Muslim couples riding a motorcycle together in Terengganu, if not married to each other, would have to attend a religious counselling session.

The latest news is that Terengganu intends to make its female tourists adhere to a dress code.

Click to enlarge

MapMelayu

The Tudung Index

Terengganu is Malaysia’s most Melayu state, where 97.0 percent of the population are Malay. Its neighbour Kelantan is 95.7 percent Malay.

Since Malays in Malaysia must all necessarily be Muslim, this infers that Kelantan and Terengganu are the most Islam-saturated states.

The Titiwangsa mountain range separates the east and west coasts of our peninsula. The practice and culture of Islam has developed with some differences in the various Malay states.

Penang is the least Malay state in our country and thus, less than half of its population are Muslim.

Are we moving from this …

tudung girl

… to this, eventually?

3Melayus

Hannah black tudung litup
HANNAH YEOH

Since Hannah Yeoh has had so much practice wearing tudung, I do not want to hear any complaints from DAP if Malaysia should follow in Brunei’s footsteps by requiring non-Muslim women to tutup aurat at official functions.

Najib opting for the Race card

“Bila dah kat tepi gaung pandai pula minta tolong bangsa sendiri”, commented a reader yesterday about Najib Razak and his latest waad in Din Turtle’s blog @ March 1, 2015 at 7:56 PM.

Penang deputy chief minister II P. Ramasamy said in his statement today – “under the circumstances of political duress, Najib has nowhere to turn but to Malay groups…”- see ‘Najib embarks on racial agenda’ (Malaysiakini, 2 March 2015)

With his back against the wall, Najib has calculated that it is most strategic to cast aside the Chinese (and perhaps the Indians too) for his political survival. He appears to be burning his boats with the non-Malays when he made his Malay Unity oath complete with the whole moon-and-stars shebang on Saturday night (Feb 28).

BELOW: Chinese opposition supporters love Muslims

CinaSayangMuslim

The alif ba ta trajectory

In our country, the Malay is inseparable from Islam. Hence Najib, by succumbing to Umno’s right wing, does not merely split our country by race but by religion too.

And however dementedly The J ‘Moderate’ Star is railing now at “religious bigots” and “extremists”, the genie can no longer be put back into the bottle.

The Chinese and Christians are only reaping what the DAP sowed. The Dapster evangelistas have made the Malays feel so besieged that these bullied Muslims are seeking refuge in becoming even more religiously orthodox.

The DAP likes to claim that Race is “so yesterday” while Religion should not be a pressing national issue compared to “good governance”, “transparency”, “accountability”, “competency” and the rest of their cakap-tak-serupa-bikin buzzwords.

Well, is it true that Malaysians are actually disinterested in religion and the bogeys are merely played up by the “divisive” Umno?

FelixiaYeapMetro

Kenapa Hannah Yeoh takde Islam di hati dan masih belum dikurniakan hidayah setelah sekian lama?

Malays are highly religious nowadays

Three quarters of a million (750,000) Facebookers liked Felixia Yeap’s entry about her decision to embrace Islam.

My blog posting about Felixia’s conversion and how it upset the J-Star readers has garnered around 25,000 page views to date.

Click to enlarge

Felixia stats

My stats box – see above – records 23,418 hits on the ‘Berita Felixia peluk Islam’ page. However, I’m rounding the figure to 25k by topping up with my own estimate of 1,500 additional reads accessed via the homepage.


Explanatory note: Total views of my homepage is 1,616,552 (hits). This figure refers to visitors who only look at what’s featured daily on my front page without proceeding further to open the Comments section, and hence not registering any click on particular postings.


Khairy lancar buku di gereja DUMCnotched 21,252 page views according to my blog data, and I estimate the overall page read to be 22,000-23,000.

Hannah Yeoh on Twitter- At DUMC for the launch of Datuk Dr Denison Jayasooria's book by @Khairykj http---t.co-AvhpeiBIf1 2014-09-03 23-19-51

Out of my blog top 10 postings, eight are ones written in bahasa Melayu while two are those in English.

My two postings in English which were most read are ‘GE13 proves that BN don’t need Chinese to form govt‘ (6 May 2013) at N0.4 and ‘Malays can rule on their own without sharing power with Chinese‘ (1 Aug 2014) at No.6.

The rest of my Malay language top 10 postings deal with the subject of Najib shooting the blogger “bangang” Umno as well as:

  • hudud
  • tudung viz. Hannah Yeoh
  • Alifah Ting
  • the Internet film insulting Prophet Muhammad / the Florida pastor who threatened to burn the Quran
  • Pakatan’s Merdeka Day 2012 logo which I said contained elements of Christian iconography (181 reader comments)

LogoMulti

Honorable mention must be made too of my postings sitting at the 11th and 12th spots respectively – ‘Fakta-fakta menarik tentang Ridhuan Tee and ‘Adakah Ridhuan Tee seorang Melayu?

The trend of my blog top stories indicates a strong interest in hot button religious topics.

Umcedel peringkat umur

The above chart shows Umcedel survey results (details here) on kalimah ‘Allah’.

Kalimah ‘Allah’ fault line

Asked whether they agreed for kalimah ‘Allah’ to be used by non-Muslims, the younger poll respondents were the most vehement in their objection – blue bar represents ‘No’.

Among the naysayers (all races):

  • 21-30 yrs old:  65%
  • 31-40 yrs old:  59%
  • 41-50 yrs old:  54%
  • 51-60 yrs old:  56%
  • above 61 yrs old:  57%

What the Umcedel study shows is that younger Malaysians are the most religiously conservative. This might have something to do with the popularity of tahfiz classes as well as Islamization of the national school, boarding schools and Mara junior science colleges.

Umcedel Kalimah Allah

The lower their education level, the more strenuously the respondents (all races) object to non-Muslims using kalimah ‘Allah’.

Overall, the majority of Malays – or almost four out of every five Malay – are adamant that non-Muslims should not use kalimah ‘Allah’. (See chart above – 77 percent of Malays say ‘No’)

The risk of Malays becoming radicalized is growing each day, especially if the provocation – e.g. Christian claim on kalimah ‘Allah’ – does not stop immediately.

Coupled with the Najib administration’s abandonment of the Chinese electorate, the risk of a violent conflict is similarly growing. This is especially so if the DAP still chooses to continue with its current brand of militant evangelical politics.

Related:

Kaedah DAP tarik undi Bumiputera Kristian Sarawak

Author:

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28 thoughts on “Will Terengganu Islam soon cross the Titiwangsa?

  1. ‘The latest news is that Terengganu intends to make its female tourists adhere to a dress code.’

    Ini sudah dinafikan oleh yang empunya badan siang tadi, saja ada orang buat false flag ni Helen…jangan terpengaruh ye…

    1. I’m aware that the article was taken down from the relevant website, see http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2015/03/02/Tganu-article-dress-down-taken-down/

      J-Star report: “State Tourism and Cultural Affairs exco chairman Datuk Mohd Jidin Shafee was quoted on state government portal http://www.teganukita.com saying the state would issue guidelines on attire for tourists, especially females.

      “The article was removed a few hours later.”

      MB: “I have spoken to the exco chairman who announced it and it seems to be a misunderstanding.”

      http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2015/03/02/Tganu-no-dress-code/

      Kira backpedal lah tu, “I was misquoted” type of excuse.

      1. Exciting laws sudah ada maa…lain negeri pun macam tu, penang bogel and ipoh couple semi bogel model…

        Terenganu negeri pelancongan la Helen, takkan dia nak buat benda yang detrimental kepada coffer state, kan tak bijak tu…ada tokey sedang test water buat false flag tu! Reverse psikologi

        1. MB already identified who made the announcement tapi kemudian tarik balik.

          It wasn’t news faked by the Beanies (false flag).

          It was someone in his own administration – State Tourism and Cultural Affairs exco chairman Datuk Mohd Jidin Shafee.

  2. ‘Coupled with the Najib administration’s abandonment of the Chinese electorate’

    Dia masih belum mau abandon terus, dia cuma nak tengok berapa ramai Melayu yang sudah lupa dia punya gendang cina acts?!

  3. re: “In our country, the Malay is inseparable from Islam. Hence Najib, by succumbing to Umno’s right wing, does not merely split our country by race but by religion too.”

    An Open Letter to Al-Baghdadi and the ISIS
    – from the Muslim Scholars of the World

    Click to access Booklet-Combined.pdf

    Allah has described Himself as the ‘Most Merciful of the merciful’.
    and He created man out of His mercy. God (Most Transcendent and Glorious) says in the Qur’an: ‘The Compassionate One has taught the Qur’an. He created man’ (Al-Rahman, 55: 1-3). And Allah (Most Transcendent and Glorious) created man for His mercy: ‘Had your Lord willed, He would have made mankind one single community, but they will continue to differ, except those on whom your Lord has mercy; and that (His Mercy) is why He created them …’ (Hud, 11: 118-119).

    The soundest way to attain this mercy is the worship of Allah (Most Transcendent and Glorious). Allah says: “And I did not create the jinn and mankind except that they may worship Me.” (Al-Dhariyat, 51: 56). Worshipping Allah is not a favour that one bestows upon The Most Transcendent and Glorious, but rather, all sustenance originates from Him: “I do not desire from them any provision, nor do I desire that they should feed Me. Indeed it is Allah Who is the Provider, the Lord of All Strength, the Firm.” (Al-Dhariyat, 51: 57-58).
    Furthermore, Allah (Most Transcendent and Glorious) revealed the Qur’an as a mercy from Him: “And We reveal of the Qur’an that which is a cure, and a mercy for believers …” (Al-Isra’, 17:82).

    Islam is the harbinger of mercy and its attributes are merciful. The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) was sent as a mercy for all the worlds, and he epitomized a Muslim’s relationship with others in this counsel: “He who shows no mercy to others will not be shown mercy”; and he said: “Have mercy on others and you yourself will be shown mercy.”

    But you, al-Baghdadi and the ISIS members have misinterpreted Islam into a religion of harshness, brutality, torture and murder. This is an enormous transgression and an outright affront to Islam, to Muslims and to the entire world. Reconsider all your actions; desist from them; repent from them; cease harming others and return to the religion of mercy.

    Allah (Most Transcendent and Glorious) says in the Qur’an:
    “Say [that God declares]: “O My servants who have sinned against their own souls, do not despair of God’s mercy. Truly God forgives all sins. Truly He is the Forgiving, the Merciful.” (Al-Zumar, 39:53).

    And Allah knows best. Bismillahir Rahmanir Rahim.

    “The Alchemy of Love” – Rumi

    1. A Believer is His Brother’s Mirror [YouTube]

      Heaven and Hell [YouTube]

      HADITH 1:

      On the authority of Abu Hurayrah (may Allah be pleased with him), who said: I heard the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) say:
      “The first of people against whom judgment will be pronounced on the Day of Resurrection will be a man who died a martyr. He will be brought and Allah will make known to him His favours and the man will recognize them.

      [The Almighty] will say: “And what did you do concerning these?” He will say: “I fought for you until I died a martyr.” The Lord will reply: “You have lied – you fought that it might be said of you: ‘He is a man of courage! And so it was said. Then he will be ordered to be dragged along on his face until he is cast into Hellfire.

      Another will be a man who had studied [religious] knowledge and had taught it and he used to recite the Quran. He will be brought forth and Allah will make known to him His favours and the man will recognize them. [The Almighty] will say: “And what did you do concerning these? He will say: “I studied [religious] knowledge and I taught it and I recited the Quran for Your sake. But the Lord will say: “You have lied – you did but study religious knowledge that it might be said of you: Oh he is learned! And you recited the Quran that it might be said [of you]: “He is a reciter! And so it was said.” Then he will be ordered to be dragged along on his face until he is cast into Hellfire.

      And another will be a man whom Allah had caused to be wealthy and to whom He had given all kinds of possessions. He will be brought before Allah Who will make known to him His favours and the man will recognize them. The Almighty will say: “And what did you do concerning them?” He will reply: “I left no path untrodden in which You have commanded money to be spent on without spending in it for Your sake. But the Lord will say: “You have lied – you did that so that it might be said of you: “He is so generous. And so it was said. Then he will be ordered to be dragged along on his face until he is cast into Hell-fire.”

      (related by Muslim, at-Tirmidhi and an-Nasa’i).

      HADITH 2:

      Abdullah ibn Mas’ud reported: The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, said, “No one who bears the weight of a seed of arrogance in his heart will enter Paradise.” A man said, “But indeed, a man loves beautiful clothes and shoes?” The Prophet said, “Verily, Allah is beautiful and He loves beauty. Arrogance means rejecting the truth and looking down on people.”

      (narrated in Sahih Muslim)

  4. Helen,

    When I was a child and throughout my secondary school time, I notice that “wearing tudung” was a rarity among Muslim ladies. Old ladies usually wore “kebaya labuh” and matching selendang”.

    That was the dresses Muslim ladies wore. Even “ulamak’s wives” did not wear “tudung”. If you care to go through old newspaper cutting, you would notice that even among PAS womenfolk, tudung was never worn.

    Things change in early 1980s. Muslim ladies started to wear tudung. Initially it was only worn by middle class. Slowly it was expected among politician wives.

    Muslim men change too, quite a number of them, wear dresses (vest) that can be mistaken as Pakistani dress. Nowadays, jubah” is gaining popularity. The lovely baju kurung is somehow sidelined.

    Whatever it is, the most important thing is to cover your “aurat”.

    1. re: “Slowly it was expected among politician wives.”

      If the politician is already wearing tudung, her husband should start wearing kopiah.

      null

  5. Helen,

    Upholding islamic principles is a duty and obligation to Muslims. In local political flavour, no Malay politician will survive if he rejects Islamic principles.

    PAS needs to find a footing in Malay politics. As it cannot match UMNO in term of development or ideas, PAS makes itself relevant by emphasizing on Islam. Never mind that many of its action has nothing to do with Islam.

    But what Trengganu MB does actually is commendable. He tries to educate Muslims on the importance of “aurat”. It may look petty. But what he does is in line with Islamic principles. So used to wearing dresses that violate Islamic principles, many Muslim ladies are surprised when they are caught wearing dresses that are deemed “indecent” from religion point of view.

    Trengganu’s decision may create ripples to non Muslims. But it is not a surprise to Malay community. Generally they agree with Trengganu.

    What Trengganu is doing serves as a lesson to others especially Kelantan. No point going around the world accusing Putrajaya refusing to enforce Islamic law WHEN you (as state government) can also start implementing Islamic principles though on smaller scale.

    I READ in today’s newspaper that Khusrin, Setiausaha kerajaan Negeri Selangor spend some time visiting restaurants where he approached civil servants eating outside lunch time. Khusrin may not mention anything about Islam but what he did was fulfilling his duty as the most senior of civil service in Selangor from Islam’s point of view.

    By the way, anyone notice that Melaka is much cleaner as compared to other states. Why? Previous Chief minister came down very hard to relevant head of departments if he found service wanting. Ali Rustam did not say anything about Islam. But HE ENFORCED ISLAMIC SPIRIT: that is appreciating physical beauty.

    Because of his Islamic value, Sungai Melaka is very clean.

    That is Islam.

    1. RE: “Trengganu’s decision may create ripples to non Muslims. But it is not a surprise to Malay community. Generally they agree with Trengganu.”

      Shamsul, you’re right. Terengganu’s decision is viewed as out-of-the-ordinary only by non-Muslims. I doubt even “liberal” Malays would consider it unexpected — they’d be unhappy about it, of course, but not surprised.

      On good days, it amuses me just how easily surprised the non-Muslim community can be when these things happen.

      On bad days, I just feel like shouting “GET OUT FROM UNDER THAT TEMPURUNG LAH!”

      1. I won’t dispute that Terengganu’s conservative moves are supported by its public as, after all, it is the most Melayu pekat state in the country (97% Malays).

        But since when have we had men who miss Friday prayers being paraded through town in hearses? And what’s the logic behind it?

        I thought Malays were big on “jangan aibkan orang”.

        1. Helen, there’s no easy answer for that.

          If I could figure out how some Christians can reconcile the gospel of love, love, love with their rabid homophobia… I’d be one step closer to answering your question.

          Now if you could dig up the position paper behind the Terengganu policy, I’m sure it would cite all the relevant principles of Islamic jurisprudence and the necessary authorities.

          But if you’re talking about the logic behind it… that’s simple. Shame is a wonderfully effective disincentive. And the hearse thing… I’m sure you’ve seen the billboards: “sembahyanglah sebelum anda disembahyangkan.”

          Oh, and FYI. When Muslims pull the “don’t teach us about our own religion” card… this is borderline.

          There is 14 centuries worth of jurisprudence dealing with these issues. When it is compulsory, for whom it is compulsory, the recognized exemptions. And not to mention, the responsibility of the state vis-a-vis the personal obligations of a Muslim.

          There is a fine line between a request for information (“What are Jews prohibited from doing on the Sabbath?”), and an expression of incredulity that’s a mask for disapproval (“So Jews can’t use electricity on Saturday? What’s the logic behind that?”)

          1. re: “the position paper behind the Terengganu policy”

            I’m not sure that they have one. As a cross-comparison, Terengganu state Tourism and Cultural Affairs exco chairman backpedalled on the tourist dress code in double quick time.

            re: “14 centuries worth of jurisprudence”

            With all of the 1,400 years of fiqh at your disposal, then surely you can pull out something to justify the hearse – any ayat? Any hadith? Fatwa? Classical scholarship?

            Consider it “a request for information” and quid pro quo. After all, my blog is informative and I make a lot of effort to inform my readers with fact. As a commenter, you ought to reciprocate.

            1. RE: “With all of the 1,400 years of fiqh at your disposal, then surely you can pull out something to justify the hearse – any ayat? Any hadith? Fatwa? Classical scholarship?”

              Ah. But that is precisely why I haven’t tried to justify the policy on religious grounds. I’m not fool enough to think that I can assess it on anything other than a superficial level.

              That bit about the “position paper.” That’s not a dig at you.

              My point is that someone would have established the necessary legal basis for that policy.

              I’d be very much surprised if the MB made that statement without the benefit of scholarly input. It would be a foolish thing to do for a Muslim in a leadership position in this country. Look at what happened to Nurul Izzah when she commented on the issue of freedom of religion.

              There is also an issue of tone and context.

              In a private conversation, I can go no-holds-barred with another Muslim using what little knowledge I have of Islamic jurisprudence. At most, I risk disapproval… maybe a reprimand.

              But to do so in a public context? Recipe for disaster.

              “But since when have we had men who miss Friday prayers being paraded through town in hearses? And what’s the logic behind it?”

              To put it in no uncertain terms, that is a request for an expert legal opinion from the ranks of the general public, i.e. your readership, on a matter of Islamic law.

              A few brave, intrepid souls might take you up on that and do their best in justifying it. But many more will keep silent, because they believe that is a matter for the scholars to determine. It is most definitely not for those who are not well-versed in Islamic law. And that is part and parcel of the religious belief.

              I’m not a card-carrying member of ISMA, nor am I a keris-waving Umnoputera. And I know where you’re coming from — your track record, your reputation. You are not criticizing or denigrating the religion.

              But I can still sense that sub-text of disapproval in your question.

              In modern parlance, the “optics” don’t look good. A non-Muslim blogger questioning the soundness of a religious policy targeting Muslims.

              Let me put it this way. If the Mufti of Perak were to ring up the Mufti of Terengganu and call the MB a bloody fool for this hearse idea — no issue. If Teresa Kok were to ask the same question as you — big issue.

              In your case, it’s borderline.

              That may not be a fact involving numbers and figures. But I think it is an accurate account of the sensitivity of this topic.

              1. Okay, thanks for taking the time and trouble to write your feedback.

                I’m not a Muslim nor a man, but nonetheless, the hearse idea is very unsettling. More than one-third of the Malaysian population are non-Muslim, and we’re still living here.

                If this goes on, we’re on our way to a theocracy because these people who make such laws – like about the hearse, unmarried women not allowed to be ferried on motorcycle, etc – are having their way without question. It’s like “Clergy knows best” ethos (‘clergy’ in quotes, depending on how you view it – whether Islam has a ‘priesthood’ class or not).

                1. I can understand the apprehension. The fear that such rules will one day extend to cover everyone, regardless of their faith.

                  It’s like how when PAS says no need to worry about hudud because it only applies to Muslims — and people look to Saudi Arabia and see that they apply hudud to EVERYONE.

                  The thing is, these kinds of discussion could have taken place in the public sphere, between Muslims and non-Muslims, maybe back in the 1950s or 1960s.

                  But now? There’s a huge trust deficit between the communities, especially when it comes to religion. So it’s very difficult to have that conversation without it becoming incendiary.

                  And when it does become incendiary, the trust deficit grows. Which makes it even harder to discuss these things.

                  So sometimes the best course of action is to let the discussion take place within the community itself. And it is taking place.

                  On the government side, you have the Council of Rulers, JAKIM, Majlis Fatwa, the state religious authorities. Outside the government, it’s groups like SIS, G25, ISMA, PERKASA. Not to mention political parties like UMNO, PAS, and PKR as well. Oh, and don’t forget Muslim bloggers.

                  So… “having their way without question.” Not by a long shot.

                  Terengganu dress code for tourists — depending on how you look at it, that was either miscommunication… or someone who did not get his way without question!

                  1. Don’t forget the DAP evangelistas’ two-faced, double dealing.

                    They went around pitching ‘PAS for all’ and then started screaming blue murder when it looks like we’re getting ‘Hudud for all’.

                    They went around saying that Chinese need not fear hudud as long as we’re not criminals and then started shrieking for PAS to get out of Pakatan when Kelantan wanted to table the hudud bill.

                    They went around in their tudung litup and baju Melayu to stir empty pots in the surau and then started to diss JAIS’s khutbah Jumaat when the sermon advised Muslimah to tutup aurat to avert rape.

                    They went around mispronouncing Quranic verses (mana ada Surah Aura) and quoting hadith and then turned around to advise non-Muslims to reject the free gift of one million Qurans being offered.

                    What kind of people are these DAP evangelistas?!

        2. HELEN,

          Who in right mind would want to be paraded in a hearse? That is exactly the point.

          It was already announced to public. So the message is please attend the compulsory Friday payers for men. Do not put yourselves in situation where you are paraded in a hearse.

          “jangan aibkan orang”. Between “jangan aibkan orang” and “risking Allah’e eternal displeasure”, the choice is quite clear.

          Lain padang lain belalang.

      2. Helen, you wrote, “The Dapster evangelistas have made the Malays feel so besieged that these bullied Muslims are seeking refuge in becoming even more religiously orthodox.”

        I think you’re giving those “Dapster evangelistas” too much credit.

        This trend has been going on for the past 30+ years. I think the “evangelista” effect is there, but it’s insignificant. Remember that Kelantan has been at the forefront of these type of regulations even before the rise of the “evangelistas.”

        The Malay community is always becoming, in popular parlance, “more” Islamic. It’s just that in places like Terengganu, it manifests itself in policies like this.

        Notice what Shamsul says about Melaka: “Ali Rustam did not say anything about Islam. But HE ENFORCED ISLAMIC SPIRIT… Because of his Islamic value, Sungai Melaka is very clean.”

        In a more economically developed state, the expression of the Islamic “spirit” deals with more complex concepts like good governance, sustainable development, proper environmental stewardship.

        Whereas in a less economically developed state, like Terengganu or Kelantan, it tends to deal with simpler issues like dress codes and prayer attendance.

        It’s not that one group prioritizes ibadah, while the other doesn’t. It’s just that one group goes after the low-hanging fruit, while the other goes for the bigger challenge.

        Ask yourself, which is the more difficult question. “How do you get women to tutup aurat?” -OR- “How do you ensure that factories remain profitable without damaging the environment?”

        Look at Islamic finance. That’s a ridiculously complicated field. You won’t find some Tok Janggut or Taliban Mullah giving advice on how to structure a USD1 billion sukuk. And for that reason, you don’t see Egypt, Afghanistan, or Somalia being at the forefront of that field.

        1. Kelantan has been under PAS the last few decades so I’m not surprised. I was in Kota Bharu when that women-traders-must-wear-tudung ruling was introduced and enforced.

          Terengganu has only 3% non-Muslim population, so again I will give allowance that their social mores (in the Islamic sense) might differ.

          My posting asks the question ‘Will Terengganu Islam soon cross the Titiwangsa?’

          Selangor has always been cosmopolitan. I believe the Dapster evangelistas equation is valid in the Klang Valley.

          Subang Jaya is really Evangelista Central. New (as in not the old denominations like Catholic) churches sprouting everywhere. SJ has a 44.7 percent Chinese population.

          1. RE: “Selangor has always been cosmopolitan. I believe the Dapster evangelistas equation is valid in the Klang Valley.”

            I think you’re seeing a correlation that may not even be statistically significant. (In so far as we can statistically analyze these kinds of things.)

            If we peg the rise of the “evangelistas” as no earlier than the mid-Noughties, then we’d have to show a significant “hardening” of Islamic mores from then until now.

            I think those views have been “hardening,” even without the presence of this “evangelista” movement. True, Muslim voices may be louder now.

            But for it to be a significant factor, we’d have to show that these kinds of policies wouldn’t be contemplated BUT FOR the “evangelistas.” Essentially, we’d have to show that there’s a tit-for-tat going on. “Evangelistas” sapu the kalimah, we close their shops on Fridays.

            And I’m equating “valid” with “significant” here, because if it’s not significant… then I don’t think it’s fair to blame them for the introduction of these policies.

            I don’t doubt that Malays are becoming “more religiously orthodox.” Or that there is a sense of being under siege.

            My pet theory is that it is a response to modernity, globalization, and the hyper-connectivity of the Internet. These are the significant factors, the ones which will determine whether those policies cross the Titiwangsa.

            1. re: “If we peg the rise of the “evangelistas” as no earlier than the mid-Noughties”

              2005? Nah, much earlier. I’d say sometime in the 1980s.

              re: “I think those views have been ‘hardening’ even without the presence of this ‘evangelista’ movement.”

              I can agree with the direction of the first part of your sentence. As for the latter half, I beg to differ. Kalu takde diorang, takde sesesiapa yang nak kebas kalimah Allah.

              In fact, the various state enactments in the 1980s prohibiting non-Muslims from using a list of Islamic terms was a reaction to these evangelical Christians trying to appropriate those words.

              Church workers and pastors were arrested in Ops Lalang 1987. Takkan lah kerajaan dengan semena-mena menyumbat orang gereja ke dalam Kamunting. Mesti bersebab. They were troublemakers even then. You can read the White Paper, it’s online.

              re: “But for it to be a significant factor, we’d have to show that these kinds of policies wouldn’t be contemplated BUT FOR the ‘evangelistas’.”

              MAIS would not have sent the circular that non-Muslims are not allowed to enter the ruang solat but for the evangelistas. It was in direct response Teo Nie Ching’s infamous photo spread in cyberspace showing her giving “tazkirah”.

              The Sultan of Selangor would not have been murka and keluarkan titah that masjid and surau are tempat ibadah solely for ORANG ISLAM but for the evangelistas.

              re: “Essentially, we’d have to show that there’s a tit-for-tat going on. “Evangelistas” sapu the kalimah, we close their shops on Fridays.”

              ‘You’ firebombed a number of churches in Jan 2010, remember? And the one worst hit, the Metro Tabernacle, was burned down.

              re: “And I’m equating ‘valid’ with ‘significant’ here, because if it’s not significant… then I don’t think it’s fair to blame them for the introduction of these policies.”

              Significant, yeah, I’d think so. Some blokes flew the black flag of jihad at the Palace of Justice, Putrajaya, when the ‘Allah’ verdict was delivered.

              Now imagine if the court decision had favoured the Christians instead. Our justices thought that such an outcome (Christians get to share Allah) would be a threat to public order.

              re: “My pet theory is that it is a response to modernity, globalization, and the hyper-connectivity of the Internet.”

              The hyper-connectivity of the Internet allows the Muslims to be subjected to Alvivi’s invitation to sup on Bak Kut Teh as juadah berbuka puasa yang “wangi, sedap and menyelerakan”. Oh, btw, according to the evangelistas, their BKT is not pork.

              1. Helen,

                “will trengganu islam cross Titiwangsa?’

                Interesting question. Islamic influence (not Trengganu islam) is doubt crossing Titiwangsa. But Selangor with non Muslim population almost 45% is of course different from Trengganu.

                Selangor is ruled by PKR. And Azmin of course is different from Mb of Trengganu. As PKR dependly heavly on Chinese, Azmin may not want to rock the boat.

                But not too long ago. while being the MB, Dr Khir was quite busy closing prostitution dens.

                ZAMAN tu dah berakhir.

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