7 out of 10 Chinese see themselves as Malaysian First, claims J-Star survey

May 11, 2015 at 3:27 am 85 comments

So we can expect seven out of every 10 Chinese in the country to be able to speak Malaysia’s national language as their native tongue (just like the ethnic Chinese in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines do their respective country’s native language) and also be willing to send their children to National School.

“Chinese” school should only cater for those three out of every 10 Chinese who view themselves by Race/Ethnicity First. The seven out of 10 Chinese who see themselves as Malaysian First must send their children to National School because vernacular school is only suitable for the Chinese Firsters.

Half of the total of vernacular schools where the Bangsa Anak Malaysia are enrolled can soon be converted to National School because the Chinese do not see themselves as Chinese and thus there is no purpose to having “Chinese” school.

These children and their parents are Malaysian First. Therefore they would naturally support the “Malaysian” (national) education stream.

Congrats to EvangeliSTAR for conducting this very useful data collection.

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Jstar moderation survey

This poll result from the J-Star‘s Moderation opinion survey should truly please Education Minister Muhyiddin Yassin. Now he has solid feedback in hand to endorse the merger of our separate education streams into one integrated “Malaysian (First)” schooling system.

The J-Star online survey attracted 5,070 participants. 71 percent of the Chinese respondents consider themselves Malaysian First – see pie chart above. Story source:Big plus for national identity‘ (The J-Star, 3 May 2015)

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Malaysian First not

Source: Merdeka Center

Meanwhile, a Merdeka Center survey from 2006 showed that only 35 percent of Malays see themselves as Malaysian First while 52 percent Malays anchor their self-identity primarily on their ethnicity, i.e. Malay First. See bar chart above

A tabulation of the results of the two surveys hints that Chinese are more patriotic than Malays because in both surveys, the Malays lag behind the Chinese in placing the utmost importance on their nationality. Malays on the other hand are more ‘race’ minded.

Entry filed under: Malaysian First. Tags: , , .

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85 Comments Add your own

  • 1. beastofburden\  |  May 11, 2015 at 4:19 am

    Yeah you are right Wong Chun Wai ,Star and their minions.

    Those 7 ppl must have studied the same nursery rhythm.

    “”’Hey Diddle, Diddle, the cat and the fiddle, the cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed to see such fun,and the cat ran away with the spoon””’

    Reply
  • 2. RINA  |  May 11, 2015 at 5:41 am

    Alamak, ada Malaysian First, Second and Third ke?

    Bangsa is a separate issue unless of cos foreigners meet people like Zairil, biological parents both Chinese, pasti mereka garu kepala – how then is he a Malay? Magic!

    Haiyaa. DNA tonyoh dengan berus dawai pun payah nak hilang.. Don’t understand why some people are so shy and all out to UBAH their race?

    Reply
    • 3. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:03 am

      re: “Don’t understand why some people are so shy and all out to UBAH their race?”

      Their achy, breaky heart which is always “troubled” over the sad fate of strangers, and too many crocodile tears rolling down their eyes (whenever they think of poor Anwar having his meals in prison) “did something to their soul”.

      That’s why they become disoriented and “easily confused” and this in turn makes them unsure of even what race they are, among other things.

      null

      Reply
    • 4. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:23 am

      Since Zairil is the Bukit Bendera MP, he should be in the Chung Ling Board of Directors which is in the district. We need someone with vision to steer Chung Ling in the 2020s without shortsightedness.

      Reply
  • 5. Urb  |  May 11, 2015 at 6:11 am

    Of course they are malaysian first. That’s why they hold the flag upside down, badmouthing their country and plan to immigrate to escape the brown stupid malay who torture them in every possible way.

    Oh, let’s not forget how they are better at speaking malay than the malays themselves.

    Reply
    • 6. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 9:56 am

      re: “malay who torture them in every possible way”

      Hahahaha

      Reply
    • 7. Kung  |  May 11, 2015 at 3:26 pm

      Egotism is the first hurdle on all sides at all levels:

      The Prime Minister of the Tang Dynasty was a national hero for his successes as a statesman and military leader. But despite his fame, power, and wealth, he considered himself a humble and devout Buddhist. Often he visited his favorite Zen master to study under him, and they seemed to get along very well. The fact that he was prime minister apparently had no effect on their relationship, which seemed to be simply one of revered master and respectful student.

      One day, during his usual visit, the Prime Minister asked the master, “Your Reverence, what is egotism according to Buddhism?” The master’s face turned red, and in a very condescending and insulting tone of voice, he shot back, “What kind of stupid question is that!?”

      This unexpected response so shocked the Prime Minister that he became sullen and angry. The Zen master then smiled and said, “THIS, Your Excellency, is egotism.”

      Reply
  • 8. really?  |  May 11, 2015 at 7:01 am

    Malaysian first? Really? Even the wakil rakyat also speaks bahasa Malaysia so badly…

    how aaah? You claim that you are born here in Malaysia…and you are Malaysian at heart but when it comes to language and culture and lifestyle…it is not Malaysian at all.

    Those who stay in Australia for instance can speak English fluently within short time due to assimilation..but why cannot speak bahasa Malaysia fluently as you stay much longer here? Malaysian first? Yeah..right

    Reply
    • 9. orangkampung  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:27 am

      When the Sultan of Johor made the call for English in school here’s some of the reaction –
      http://www.malaysiakini.com/news/297583

      One in particular caught my eye –
      “Yes, I agreed fully that it will promote unity among citizens and they will have a good command of English. Of course we can STUDY BM, MANDARIN or TAMIL as a SECOND LANGUAGE- it’s up to parents and students to choose.”
      (The shouting emphasis is mine)

      Reply
      • 10. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:33 am

        Miss Universe Japan 2015, Ariana Miyamoto

        Reply
  • 11. kluz  |  May 11, 2015 at 7:47 am

    what language used for the survey.. in english? Chinese? Or Bahasa Melayu.. is there any question about be able to talk, write in Malay. Or can you sing negaraku, do you know by hard rukun negara. Can we have a look at the survey question.

    Reply
  • 12. mulanmalaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 7:52 am

    Finally Chinese Recreational Club will close due to lack lustre support. Chinese New Year will be a small celebration and parents are taking their sons out of Chung Ling and putting them at St Xaviers.

    Hari Malaysia will be 2 days since Chinese New Year has become one day. Hopefully Hari Malaysia will become 1 week since Chinese New Year, Diwali and Christmas will be cancelled.

    Will that happen?

    Perhaps Peng Hua will get her first Indian headmistress

    Reply
    • 13. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 9:54 am

      re: “Perhaps Peng Hua will get her first Indian headmistress”

      Like Hannah Yeoh’s daughter, she’s not Indian but Bangsa Anak Malaysia Cina.

      Reply
  • 14. jentayu  |  May 11, 2015 at 8:09 am

    Malaysian 1st but still speak bahasa malaysia like they just arrived from tongkang yesterday or prefer english over bahasa in any occasion.

    These people definition of patriotism is laughable. Let us see who runs first when the nation is at the brink of war. Then we can talk about patriotism.

    Reply
    • 15. orangkampung  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:36 am

      This video always bring a tear to my eye.

      Reply
      • 16. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:41 am

        Err, ‘soalan mulut’ oleh pemberita Malaysian First tu mencuit hati?

        Reply
        • 17. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:49 am

          Jangan terbulu bulu bila teng gok bidio ini.

          Tak dak chacat cela ragi.

          Reply
          • 18. orangkampung  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:03 am

            Lols. Who needs to watch RajaLawak when you can watch these jokers?

            Reply
  • 19. Jabalnur Jabalthur  |  May 11, 2015 at 8:15 am

    Helen…..A classic example of “Cakap tak Serupa Bikin….”After all, Malaysia Firsters are known for their hypocrisy.

    They wear the hijab , but inside them they hate Islam, Go to Malay homes, sapu all their rendangs, yet as soon as they are out, they want the Bahasa Malaysia to be abolished.

    They quote extensively from the Quran, but only during election campaigns- by the way what maketh a person who quotes from a holy book her or she does not believe?

    !!!!!!!!!H Y P O C R I T E S !!!!!!!!!!!!

    I would not have enough space here if I were to list out their “holiness”

    Reply
  • 20. mulanmalaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 8:19 am

    Finally the pitchy Lung Piao Piao and MyFM DJ Chinese New Year albums will be stopped and replaced with pitchy renditions of Malaysia Truly Asia.
    Which shows DJs can’t sing.
    #dandybetterworld# #pitchysinginguncool#

    Reply
  • 21. tebing tinggi  |  May 11, 2015 at 8:23 am

    Good news for Najib and DAP ,the concept of 1Malaysia and Malaysian Malaysia are near success .
    Lesser money will be spends on racial requirement .

    Reply
  • 22. orangkampung  |  May 11, 2015 at 9:26 am

    Let me put this in the most simplistic form.

    That’s because they consider themselves as Malaysia because they love nasi lemak, pisang goreng (oops silap, goreng pisang), rendang and they celebrate Hari Raya with their one malay friend. They speak enough malay to get by.

    Now isn’t that similar to the malays’ view? But then it become racist because that nasi lemak, rendang and pisang goreng come from the Malay culture. So to them, we stay the same while they are adapting, hence we are racist. I can live with that.

    Reply
    • 23. Faizal  |  May 11, 2015 at 4:41 pm

      RE: “pisang goreng (oops silap, goreng pisang)”

      Hehe, both can lah. Fried banana = pisang goreng. Banana fritters = goreng pisang.

      Reply
  • 24. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:07 am

    Come to think of it. Hannah and her church can do more to become Bangsa Malaysia.

    Stop the practice of having Mandarin language services in church. Start with DUMC and City Harvest. No more Chinese Church Ministry.

    Start using only Bahasa in services. Since they want the Allah word, then make full use of it by only using Bahasa and English (but less since it is only a second language).

    Stop the practice of racially segmented churches. No more Tamil Methodist or Cantonese Methodist. The word must be heard by all and should not be hidden. Those who understand Tamil will be blessed but those who cannot speak Tamil will miss out.

    No more Hockien service. Those who are Hakka will not be blessed and this is unfair.

    Reply
  • 25. AYAH  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:58 am

    The J-Star tried very hard but it shows up what they are really like. Good work WCW.

    Reply
  • 26. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:15 am

    Long time no hear.

    Reply
  • 27. sirimuda  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:17 am

    Helen when a house is on fire what you tend to do first
    When a shepherd shouts for wolf what do the village think first
    A Muslim Malay meets another Muslim what do they greets each other first
    And a Chinese who greets another local Chinese does they wish Malaysia first

    Reply
    • 28. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:22 am

      re: “And a Chinese who greets another local Chinese does they wish Malaysia first”

      When a local evangelista greets another local evangelista, he will ask if the other fella’s daughter was successful in her application for Permanent Residence in Tasmania, Australia. And then they’ll complain about how Malaysia is oppressing and persecuting them even though they’re such a meek and mild minority group.

      Reply
  • 29. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:19 am

    Reply
    • 30. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:27 am

      Have you noticed that most of the Chinese troublemakers belong to a certain religious affiliation?

      Sorry that you kena tempias through this observation of mine but that’s what I see about those who shout the loudest, complain the most or are the sneakiest/worst smart alecks.

      What do you think (seriously)?

      Reply
      • 31. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:36 am

        Seriously! I agree with you. That’s why I am now a Christian Murtad. How do you attend church when it has become a Sunday Ceramah.

        Reply
        • 32. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 12:11 pm

          Does the double whammy make you uncomfortable? Make that triple whammy as you’re also living in the Dapster Central state. How do you see the political developments ahead?

          Reply
          • 33. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 12:30 pm

            Penang will be Pakatan Central. As long as the youth blindly in a cultist manner follow the DAP, nothing will change.

            And don’t you dare trust the old people. They say they don’t support LGE but in the end they will vote for him – they cannot have a non Teng Nang government in Penang.

            Churches, sad to say, are full of Pakatan supporters – so much so PAS can make a lawatan muhibbah to wish the Bishop. Temples are not angels too… they become venues for people to go bald against BN.

            As the apek (I posted earlier) said, since (Per)MaTang Pau(h) win, he does not feel scared.

            The best thing of all is that the DAP has made the distrust between the public and public service larger. See how the police, customs, election commission has been labeled an BN minions. If you talk to the man on the street when they got a MPBP parking summons, it is the fault of the BN government that made the state broke. So they state will issue summons. (MPBP is under the DAP government but WTF)

            The same cultist behavior will prevail in Selangor with a large pendatang Penang population. (If in the Klang valley, you find many non Cantonese speaking but Hockien speaking Chinese, you can safely say there are Penang pendatangs)

            Reply
            • 34. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 1:10 pm

              re: “Penang will be Pakatan Central.”

              Kedah will take you back.

              re: “As long as the youth blindly in a cultist manner follow the DAP, nothing will change.”

              How can things change when 90 percent of the Chinese support DAP, and 95 percent of media and social media in the Chinese and English languages are controlled by the Dapster evangelistas?

              re: “And don’t you dare trust the old people. They say they don’t support LGE but in the end they will vote for him – they cannot have a non Teng Nang government in Penang.”

              Am aware.

              re: “Temples are not angels too… they become venues for people to go bald against BN.”

              Sigh. They hate Umno-BN too much. They must learn from their Chinese evangelical Christian brethren how to mouth “love love love”.

              re: “Churches, sad to say, are full of Pakatan supporters – so much so PAS can make a lawatan muhibbah to wish the Bishop.”

              At least the PAS people when they pay their visit don’t masquerade by wearing crucifix and saying “Hallelujah, Hosanna Hosanna!” unlike the “Insya Allah”-proclaiming evangelistas.

              re: “See how the police, customs, election commission has been labeled an BN minions.”

              To be more accurate, they’re labelled “anjing Umno” by the profanity-spewing Dapsters.

              re: “The same cultist behavior will prevail in Selangor with a large pendatang Penang population. (If in the Klang valley, you find many non Cantonese speaking but Hockien speaking Chinese, you can safely say there are Penang pendatangs)”

              Got the Selangor homegrown Cantonese-speaking version – in Jerusubang.

              Reply
              • 35. AC-DC  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:05 pm

                “(If in the Klang valley, you find many non Cantonese speaking but Hockien speaking Chinese, you can safely say there are Penang pendatangs)”

                How little you know the area. Have you ever been to Klang and Pelabuhan Klang?

                Reply
                • 36. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:26 pm

                  Let me first amend my spelling. “Hockien” is how Mulan spells it (which I copypasted). I believe it is more commonly spelled Hokkien.

                  Yes, I do know Klang town a little but I’m more familiar with the Little India rows.

                  I had Hokkien-speaking evangelical Christian Chinese in mind. Are the Hokkiens in Klang the evangelistas like those in Subang Jaya?

                  Reply
                  • 37. AC-DC  |  May 12, 2015 at 1:55 pm

                    Many of the Klang Hokkiens I know are non-Christians.

                    Reply
                    • 38. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 2:00 pm

                      That’s why in the first place I specified Jerusubang, i.e. Hokkien-speaking Born Again Christians in Subang.

                      Chinese living in the semi-urban and rural areas are not yet as Christianized as the ones living in the cities.

                    • 39. AC-DC  |  May 12, 2015 at 2:22 pm

                      “That’s why in the first place I specified Jerusubang, i.e. Hokkien-speaking Born Again Christians in Subang.”


                      34. Helen Ang | May 11, 2015 at 1:10 pm

                      Got the Selangor homegrown Cantonese-speaking version – in Jerusubang.

                      Come back once you have made up your mind. Flip a coin if you can’t…

                    • 40. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 2:25 pm

                      Sorry, both.

                      Cantonese in the context of my initial statement, and Hokkien in how the thread has since evolved, with you being the one to drag us to Hokkien-speaking Klang.

                      However, the Canto and Hokkien Christians I have in mind are the Hannah Yeoh types (she converted at the age of 19).

                • 41. Mulan of Malaysia  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:47 pm

                  “How little you know the area.”

                  Then why during Chinese New Year the Klang Valley is literally empty. The W and B cars all end up in Penang.
                  Is it the tradition to turn off the taps during Chinese New Year in Selangor? Klang Valley idoes not just include Klang. The populace is in KL, PJ, Subang, Kelana etc.

                  And yes. I have been to Klang. Lived there too. Esp in the port area. Such a bitch to go to KL.

                  Reply
                  • 42. AC-DC  |  May 12, 2015 at 2:14 pm

                    “Then why during Chinese New Year the Klang Valley is literally empty. The W and B cars all end up in Penang.”

                    So what you imply is:

                    1. There is literally no traffic in Klang, Port Klang, Shah Alam, Bukit Jalil, Subang, Damansara, Hulu Langat, Kuala Lumpur, Gombak, Cheras, and the other regions at all. All seven million residents are in Penang.

                    2. All Klang Valley residents are Penang Chinese.

                    Such hyperbole.

                    Reply
        • 43. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 9:12 pm

          Sunday ceramah in church?

          They were preaching politics instead of Jesus?

          This is some serious allegation. Name the church and name the pastor, can?

          Reply
      • 44. AC-DC  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:01 pm

        “Have you noticed that most of the Chinese troublemakers belong to a certain religious affiliation?”

        The ultra nationalists regard Dong Zhong and Chinese educationalists as “trouble makers”. I wonder what is the predominant religion of the people in Dong Zhong and other organisations.

        Reply
        • 45. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:41 pm

          re: “The ultra nationalists regard Dong Zhong and Chinese educationalists as ‘troublemakers’.”

          You’re correct about the Malay nationalists. However, the Isma and Muslim NGO crowd consider the evangelical Christians as the chief troublemakers.

          There is less friction between Dongzong and Perkasa because DZ functions in hanyu (Mandarin) while Perkasa uses BM. There is little direct overlap and Perkasa is not reading hanzi and DZ is not speaking or writing in BM.

          Isma however is able to monitor the evangelistas through the overlapping English-language medium. I had meant that most of the provocative writings – e.g. by the infamous Christian @YouTiup aka Cina-TM – that offends the Muslims is in English.

          Reply
  • 46. kampong lad  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:55 am

    yg mengaku malaysian first tu, mintak depa define apa erti malaysian.

    Reply
  • 47. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 1:07 pm

    Much prominence is placed, on ‘fluent bahasa’ as an impromptu prerequisite of sorts, upon the non-Malays as to what qualifiy them as Malaysian first. I don’t disagree the ability to speak fluent BM (and other languages) is a desirable trait, but to use that as a yardstick to measure one’s ‘Malaysian-ness’ ? The word shallow comes to mind.

    The links below are intended only to reflect the fallacy of the ‘Malaysian first’ criterion. To generalize on it would mean I am subscribing to your failed logic.

    Malaysian women offer sexual gratification to foreign fighters.
    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/asia/2014/08/28/Report-Malaysian-women-join-ISIS-to-comfort-militants-.html

    Malaysian soldiers join ISIS
    http://www.ibtimes.com/malaysia-army-isis-70-soldiers-have-joined-islamic-state-officials-say-1879299

    Let’s see…

    speak fluent Malay – check
    Non evangelical – check
    Respect Islam – check

    Malaysian first?

    Reply
    • 48. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 1:13 pm

      re: “… a yardstick to measure one’s ‘Malaysian-ness’ ? The word shallow comes to mind. […] the fallacy of the ‘Malaysian first’ criterion.”

      What’s your criteria for Malaysian Firstness?

      Reply
      • 49. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 1:28 pm

        Will get back to you

        Reply
      • 50. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 4:49 pm

        For the non-Malays that are born on this land, it is a natural progression to identify themselves as Malaysian first. Not having known any other country, Malaysia is their motherland, period. The question to ponder is why are their allegiance being questioned? What more by the very same group who openly declared they don’t identify themselves as ‘Malaysian first’ but by their ethnicity?

        You see the irony?

        Irony aside, the implications would be a series of biases that could never be reconciled. One can nurture nationalism, but ethnicity is something one is born with. Can’t change that. You can talk like them, dress like them but you can never be one of them. That is the downside of divisions along ethnic lines. It is not inclusive and ‘ethnic first’ mentality meant lack of willingness to accept others as equal.

        The constitution is clear on what defines Malaysia and subsequently, a Malaysian. I don’t need to go there. Instead of second guessing the non-Malays their nationalism, perhaps it is more conducive to educate the ethnic-first masses on the significance of unity in face of stiff global competition. All Malaysians are on the same boat, so to speak.

        Reply
        • 51. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 5:29 pm

          Let’s rewind. You said:

          (a) too much prominence is placed on ‘fluent bahasa’ as a prerequisite of Malaysian Firstness

          (b) it is shallow to use BM fluency as the yardstick to measure one’s ‘Malaysian-ness’

          (c) it is “failed logic” to insist that BM be the ‘Malaysian first’ criterion

          So I asked, what is your criteria for measuring Malaysian Firstness, then?

          http://www.citizenship.gov.au/learn/cit_test/_pdf/testable-content-nov2009.pdf

          Here’s how other countries test for citizenship. See, http://www.citizenship.gov.au/learn/cit_test/_pdf/practice-questions.pdf

          You have to know about (Australian) law, system of government, history, national symbols and you have to know English to take the test in English.

          On the applying for citizenship page, http://www.citizenship.gov.au/applying/ … the FAQ covers proving English competency.

          So okay, since you believe that BM competency is a shallow criterion for Malaysian Firstness, then what’s yours?

          You refer to the Constitution. So what from the Constitution relates to the qualities of a citizen which the 71 percent (Chinese) Malaysian Firsters ought to have?

          Reply
          • 52. Ahmad bin Ibrahim  |  May 11, 2015 at 7:41 pm

            Thx for the links Miss H. This HH will keep reply although he has to tegakkan benang yang basah.

            Reply
            • 53. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:24 pm

              Are you lost, joining in the fray or simply doing your regular sychophantic rounds?

              Reply
          • 54. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 8:54 pm

            To clarify a little..

            Quote: c) it is “failed logic” to insist that BM be the ‘Malaysian first’ criterion

            What I meant is, it is ‘failed logic’ to generalize the Chinese as doubtful firsters on account of their lack of fluent BM. Just as it is not apt to generalize on the majority of Muslims on account of those ISIS sympathizers.

            Our current discussion emanates from the Star opinion poll. The poll results we are now discussing are responses to the poll questions, not mine.

            No, I don’t have a specific Malaysia first criteria.

            Neither do I impose criterias on the poll respondents (like fluent BM, goes to national school etc. You get the gist of it) to question their worthiness to be polled and what more, the gall to call themselves Malaysian first.

            I view respondents seeing themselves Malaysian first before race as the conclusion, not the question.

            http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2015/05/03/Big-plus-for-national-identity-Moderation-survey-shows-encouraging-results/.

            Reply
            • 55. HH  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:03 pm

              Quote: You refer to the Constitution. So what from the Constitution relates to the qualities of a citizen which the 71 percent (Chinese) Malaysian Firsters ought to have?

              Why ask about the 71%? Why not 100%?

              I thought the Constitution governs all Malaysians? The onus of adhering to the Constitution should rightly fall on the 100%.

              For starters, knowing your concern for the linguistic ability of the people, how about the non-prohibition of mother tomgue?

              Reply
              • 56. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:57 pm

                re: “knowing your concern for the linguistic ability of the people”

                I’m not overly concerned about people’s linguistic ability. I’ve never corrected nor criticised any of my readers’ bad or broken English or wrong spelling.

                This bunch of people are calling themselves Malaysian First. I’m discussing the Constitution, ‘social contract’, integration and the accommodation for vernacular school.

                re: “how about the non-prohibition of mother tongue?”

                How about Article 152 of the Federal Constitution?

                Reply
                • 57. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 8:53 am

                  If you question whether 7 out of 10 Chinese polled are able to speak the national language as well as their native tongue, that would naturally imply a certain fluency is expected. If mother tongue are spoken at home, (the right to do so under Article 152 1a) then it would be reasonable to assume BM is their second language.(for non-Malays.)But of course i am mindful that this does not negate the fact BM is the official language.

                  Bahasa is the official medium for Governmental agencies/offices. Governmental recruitment policies and quotas in favor of the bumis further relegate the need to master BM for non-Malays to a bare minimum. Most non-Malays know the basic BM to get by their daily interactions with governmental offices or among Malay friends/colleagues. English is widely used in private firms.

                  The reality is, the drive to master a langusge is mostly needs-driven. It is hardly learned as a patriotism showcase.

                  Article 152 1a has provision for the usage of mother tongue.

                  ***********
                  Article number: 152u

                  152.

                  ● (1) The national language shall be the Malay language and shall be in such script as Parliament

                  may by law* provide: Provided that-

                  ❍ (a) no person shall be prohibited or prevented from using (otherwise than for official purposes), or from teaching or learning, any other language; and

                  ❍ (b) nothing in this Clause shall prejudice the right of the Federal Government or of any State Government to preserve and sustain the use and study of the language of any other community in the Federation

                  Reply
                  • 58. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:35 am

                    re: “The reality is, the drive to master a language is mostly needs-driven. It is hardly learned as a patriotism showcase.”

                    Okay, so the reality is that there is no ‘need’ (push, economic compulsion) for the Chinese to master BM.

                    Yet Chinese are a quarter of the population. How do they interact – beyond ordering Teh Tarik and instructing the Indonesian maid – with the rest of the 75% of the population (beyond the professional class who can speak English)?

                    Here is the DAP and its spiritual allies (like The J-Star) screaming that 7 out of 10 Chinese are Malaysian First. So these Chinese are model Malaysians.

                    Are the “half-baked bahasa” speakers to be the model (template) for the Malaysians who are ‘first’, i.e. foremost in representing what/who a Malaysian is?

                    Would other minorities claim to be their Nationality First and yet at the same time disdain the country’s national language to the point of not bothering to be able to speak it with some decency?

                    Would minorities of Turkish descent in Germany claim to be German First but speak half-baked German? Would minorities of Arab descent in France claim to be French First but speak half-baked French? Would minorities of Korean descent in the USA claim to be American First but speak half-baked English?

                    Here the Chinese speak BM like they just got off the boat two weeks prior but call people from the definitive culture, i.e. Malays “racist” for questioning their claim to Firstness.

                    Reply
                    • 59. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 3:04 pm

                      Quote: Here is the DAP and its spiritual allies (like The J-Star) screaming that 7 out of 10 Chinese are Malaysian First. So these Chinese are model Malaysians.

                      So this is what it is all about. You don’t think these Chinese are model Malaysians because who knows how proficient are their BM eh? Ah well, like you say, my blog, my like. Their paper, their like.

                      Quote: Would other minorities claim to be their Nationality First and yet at the same time disdain the country’s national language to the point of not bothering to be able to speak it with some decency?

                      Disdain for the National language? Gee, where would folks get to practice their Bahasa after they leave school? Hang around Government offices? Maybe watch more Raja Lawak to dig their jokes. The point of a language is to enable communication. If someone is able to get their message through, then mission accomplished.

                      Let’s be frank, is fluent BM the real issue? Not able to communicate with others? in the age of iPads and mobile phones? What more, are Malaysians identified by their National language alone? Then the only eligible Chinese model candidate left that fits the bill to a T would be Ridhuan. Unless you want to nominate your good self.

                      Quote: Would minorities of Turkish descent in Germany claim to be German First but speak half-baked German? Would minorities of Arab descent in France claim to be French First but speak half-baked French? Would minorities of Korean descent in the USA claim to be American First but speak half-baked English?

                      Maybe you can take a calculator and work out the percentage of minority in those countries. Tell you what, throw in everybody’s favourite, Indonesia as well. See the percentage.

                      Turks in Germany – 3.7%
                      Chinese in Indonesia – 1.2%
                      Koreans in US – 0.6%
                      Chinese in Malaysia – 24%

                      What does that tell you. Mastering the national language for the above are driven by needs or pure nationalism? I don’t profess to know. But what I can say is, it is essential survival tool 101 in view of their low population where it is not sustainable for the minorities to strive on their own. Logically speaking of course. So hardly helpful in our current discussion.

                      Quote: Here the Chinese speak BM like they just got off the boat two weeks prior but call people from the definitive culture, i.e. Malays “racist” for questioning their claim to Firstness.

                      Hello? The Malays are questioning their claim? Excuse me, the same group that relegated their national identity secondary to ethnicity? Gee, the irony.

                      If there is no dispute on the alleged ‘race over nationalism’ claim by certain group, then why is racist the wrong word?

                      My half-baked[sic] was an inference to the older generation and not the younger set.

                    • 60. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 3:41 pm

                      re: “You don’t think these Chinese are model Malaysians because who knows how proficient [is] their BM eh?”

                      And you think Chinese are model Malaysians based on what – their love of Nasi Lemak Ayam, their civic consciousness, their patriotism (participation in the Defence Forces) and payment of income tax? Do share with us your criteria, please, if you’re implying an assertion.

                      re: “Ah well, like you say, my blog, my like. Their paper, their like.”

                      Fine, it’s The J-Star‘s like and the paper belongs to the MCA and the MCA is in the BN coalition. When the MCA is obliterated in GE14, then they can go back to the drawing board.

                      re: “Disdain for the National language? Gee, where would folks get to practice their Bahasa after they leave school? Hang around Government offices? Maybe watch more Raja Lawak to dig their jokes.”

                      Refusing or being unable to speak BM is one thing. Insisting that BM is useless and there’s no point to mastering it is another.

                      re: “The point of a language is to enable communication. If someone is able to get their message through, then mission accomplished.”

                      If you really think that the Chinese community is able to get their point through, then fine again. Negotiate for your church crosses. Why all the whinging and accusations?

                      re: “Let’s be frank, is fluent BM the real issue? Not able to communicate with others? in the age of iPads and mobile phones?”

                      If you want to trot out a Bak-Kut-Teh-is-not-pork argument, no skin off my nose. Communicate with all your Love-Love-Love chants and flower-giving. Some of you seem to think it’s effective enough.

                      re: “What more, are Malaysians identified by their National language alone?”

                      I’ve already asked you several times already to pick/state any criterion that you believe can be the yardstick for identifying Malaysian-ness. Do please give us one or two – Nasi Lemak? Teh Tarik?

                      re: “Then the only eligible Chinese model candidate left that fits the bill to a T would be Ridhuan. Unless you want to nominate your good self.”

                      Naaaah. I’m not trying hard enough. How about nominating that perpetually food craving, crying Bangsa Anak Malaysia in Subang Jaya who wears tudung to Occupy Masjid? She dresses the part to the T – right to tudung litup (full head-covering and not merely a draped selendang alone).

                      BELOW: Hannah Yeoh in her tudung

                      null

                      re: “Turks in Germany – 3.7% Chinese in Indonesia – 1.2% Koreans in US – 0.6% Chinese in Malaysia – 24%”

                      So the Chinese in Malaysia plan to establish the autonomous ‘papacy’ of Jerusubang where there’s no need or use for BM because the sizeable (quarter of population) numbers is linguistically self-sustaining like Quebec in Canada, is it? Well, if you have such ambitions, don’t be coy and stop fudging about the separatism.

                      re: “it is essential survival tool 101 in view of their low population where it is not sustainable for the minorities to strive on their own. Logically speaking of course. So hardly helpful in our current discussion.”

                      Okay, so the 12.3 percent American blacks and 12.5 percent American Hispanics (totally a minority of 25% like the Chinese in Malaysia) unlike the low 0.6% – 3.7% figures you cite for Germany, Indonesia etc. need not speak English either?

                      re: “Here the Chinese speak BM like they just got off the boat two weeks prior but call people from the definitive culture, i.e. Malays “racist” for questioning their claim to Firstness.” / “Hello? The Malays are questioning their claim? Excuse me, the same group that relegated their national identity secondary to ethnicity? Gee, the irony.”

                      So you think it is gee, so ironic for the Malays to be questioning the ‘patriotism’ (nationality consciousness/loyalty) of the Chinese? And thus, Malays must concur with or concede to the Firster claim by the J-Star crowd?

                      re: “If there is no dispute on the alleged ‘race over nationalism’ claim by certain group, then why is racist the wrong word?”

                      So you agree that it is “racist” for Malays to expect the Chinese majority to speak BM with some minimal competence?

                      re: “My half-baked[sic] was an inference to the older generation and not the younger set.”

                      The younger set is no better. The “terbulu-bulu” mispronunciation cited by Ridhuan Tee was a gaffe made by a youngish person.

            • 61. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 11:52 pm

              re: “the gall to call themselves Malaysian first”

              What is the basis for proclaiming themselves Malaysian First. There must be a rationale.

              If someone is a soldier and was killed in the line of duty (i.e. died for his country), then it is acknowledged that he is a patriot who put the country above his life.

              Reply
              • 62. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 8:42 am

                Quote: This bunch of people are calling themselves Malaysian First. I’m discussing the Constitution, ‘social contract’, integration and the accommodation for vernacular school.

                But it is inter-related in this discussion. The way I see it, a bunch of people were polled. Based on the poll result, a general consensus was reached. Over 70% Chinese see themselves as Malaysian first. You have no qualms about the results obtained, the questions asked nor the poll method. I gather the pertinent question on your mind is whether of this 71%, do they have what it takes to stake their claim of being above ethnicity. The Constitution is then applied to size them up.

                Venacular schools, social contract, BM etc are the status quo. I am not saying there will not be changes in the future, but for the time being, as it had always been, why try to fix it if it ain’t broke? Venacular schools, half-baked bahasa and all are not a detriment to national unity but our national identity. Venacular schools are definitely no more a divisive factor than groups subscribing to ethnicity over country.

                Reply
                • 63. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:21 am

                  re: “Venacular schools, half-baked bahasa and all are not a detriment to national unity but our national identity.”

                  I think vernacular schools can be allowed to stay. However, enrollment should only be open to the 30% Chinese-oriented families. DAP members of the Malaysian First party should not send their children to Chinese school. It is against the DAP “Malaysian Malaysia” ideology that they keep bragging about.

                  Is the “half-baked bahasa” among a sizable number of the population helpful for our national unity. How will they communicate meaningfully with other Malaysians who don’t speak Chinese?

                  And what is our “national identity”? Can you please suggest a definition in a few short words?

                  Reply
              • 64. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 9:36 am

                Quote: If someone is a soldier and was killed in the line of duty (i.e. died for his country), then it is acknowledged that he is a patriot who put the country above his life.

                While it is easier to pass judgement on somebody who lives by the military code of conduct, it is trickier to judge a civilian whom has the freedom to live their life as they wish, within the law of the country. Good citizen 101 would just deem anybody who abide the law as a good citizen. The bare minimum, at least.

                Seeing themselves as Malaysian first? Let’s do a firster test..

                1. http://singaporeseen.stomp.com.sg/singaporeseen/this-urban-jungle/malaysian-woman-who-hit-car-with-steering-wheel-lock-says-facebook-apology-was

                2. http://www.straitstimes.com/news/asia/south-east-asia/story/malaysia-sex-blogger-alvin-tan-mocks-muslims-latest-topless-video-20

                3. http://www.theborneopost.com/2012/09/30/group-of-mat-rempit-turn-on-driver-after-minor-accident/

                If you had defended any of the above because they share your skin color, then you are out of the Malaysian Firster club.

                Reply
                • 65. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 11:14 am

                  Given how racial we (both the Chinese and Malay communities) are, and as the way the public have taken sides according to ethnic lines in the above incidents you listed, then it is the Chinese who should be worried.

                  Chinese are minority. Chinese are not in the police or the army. Chinese are bespectacled geeks in desk jobs or fei chai hustlers like Jho Loh. More Malays do the fieldwork kind of jobs. They play football and are generally fitter.

                  When a fight breaks out, whether over KFC coupon or a fender-bender on a gridlocked highway, the Chinese will be the one(s) worse off in the physical altercation.

                  Reply
                  • 66. bnm  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:17 pm

                    re: then it is the Chinese who should be worried.

                    Why?

                    re: Chinese are not in the police or the army.

                    Are you insinuating that the Malays will abuse the institution of police and army?

                    Reply
                    • 67. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:21 pm

                      Why?

                      People like you.

                      Depending on how far people like you wear their (police) patience thin.

                    • 68. bnm  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:33 pm

                      re: Depending on how far people like you wear their (police) patience thin.

                      No point putting unsubstantiated claim. The best is to test your theory. Put down your bet. When you think the patience of the police will be worn out? 5 years from now? 10 years? Or even 20 years?

                • 69. bnm  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:28 pm

                  re: If someone is a soldier and was killed in the line of duty (i.e. died for his country), then it is acknowledged that he is a patriot who put the country above his life.

                  Why is that so? The soldier understood from day one when he joined the forces that his life is at stake. The state paid him salary/allowance in compensation to him risking his life. This is a business transaction just like an executive who works in a company. The former provides his services/expertise and the company pays him in return. If a person is unable to accept the risk of a job (i.e. soldier), why join at the first place?

                  Moreover, for one example of a soldier that sacrificed his life in battle we have thousands of soldiers in Msia that have yet to engage in battle and show their sacrifices. They are just doing trainings, drills and disaster rescue work. Not a sacrifice as they are paid.

                  Reply
                  • 70. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:33 pm

                    Okay, if you believe that being a soldier and getting paid for it is “a business transaction just like an executive who works in a company”, what more can I say (shrug)?

                    Reply
            • 71. RINA  |  May 12, 2015 at 5:57 am

              Bila kita bercampur dengan Chinese from Indonesia, immediately we can identify them as Indonesians. I notice even with their own family members they yak yak in Bahasa Indonesia.

              Sini payah sekali jumpa keluarga Cina or a group of Chinese macam depa kecuali yang datang dari kaum Baba dan Nyonya.

              Makes it difficult for ordinary Malaysians to distinguish if they are Malaysians or from Mainland China, Hongkong, Taiwan or Singapore.

              Worse, our wakil rakyats.. tergelak aside, bulu bulu what actually ws he trying to say, I sendiri tak faham!

              Itu pasai kita sebut ‘Bahasa Jiwa Bangsa’.

              Reply
              • 72. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 3:50 pm

                Freaky.

                I was going to say the same thing about those Indonesians. Seeing them on the LRT with their big family in tow, I too can no longer distinguish them from the Malaysian Malays.

                I guess it does not matter anymore. They are afterall Malaysians now with bona fide ICs.

                1Malaysia.

                Reply
                • 73. RINA  |  May 12, 2015 at 11:53 pm

                  As Bumupitras, we can easily identify Indons..dgn Bumiputras. Even their writings, we can easily spot them.

                  Pembawakan mereka lain. Take the lady YB in Selangor for instant, kaw kaw darah pekat Indon. Wajah, suara dan gaya dia. Tu semua semulajadi, payah nak ubah tau..

                  The way they write some alphabets and numbers tak sama dgn yg cikgu2 ajaq anak2 kita kat sekolah sini.

                  Tu la hang kena fasih dalam Bahasa Malaysia dan banyak bergaul dgn Bumiputras.. so you can pick their loghat.. bajau, kelantanese, Dayak bahasa dan loghat depa lain tau..

                  Nak kenal Indonesian Chinese from Indonesia mudah sekali.. they use Bahasa Indonesia. Nak kenal Chinese Baba n nyonya, bahasa mereka lembut, asal usul mereka dari golongan Bangsawan dan dulu2 berhubung kait rapat dgn istana Tanah Melayu.

                  Reply
  • 74. Surrhead  |  May 11, 2015 at 1:51 pm

    is this the most pressing issue for Malaysia currently?? is it like curb this and Malaysia is problem free?? some people need to get their priorities right……unless a diversion is needed from more pressing issues

    Reply
    • 75. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 2:19 pm

      re: “is this the most pressing issue for Malaysia currently??”

      helenang.wordpress.com is only a personal blog with a few thousand niche readers. My jottings hardly determine the national agenda.

      re: “is it like curb this and Malaysia is problem free??”

      You’ll have to ask The J-Star. They carried out the opinion survey. It is also the EvangeliSTAR media that is making it a big story with multiple write-ups over the last week.

      re: “some people need to get their priorities right……”

      By this I reckon you’re referring to the J-Star CEO and group editor? Their newspaper is the most profitable national tabloid whose circulation is almost 290,000 copies daily. The J-Star‘s digital version (excluding Star Online) is an additional 81,500 copies.

      The EvangeliSTAR media group reaches over a million pair of eyeballs each day. So you have to ask their editorial floor whether this issue is their priority.

      re: “unless a diversion is needed from more pressing issues”

      Urm, MCA wants to remain in Cabinet regardless of whether there is an Umno coup, and they are trying to ingratiate themselves with the Malay nationalist leadership? Just sayin’/ speculating.

      Reply
  • 76. C72  |  May 11, 2015 at 4:06 pm

    “Malaysian First” is a patently false construct.

    It is deliberately creating a simplistic, exclusionary mindset that can only hold one concept in mind at a time and in a linear fashion. Which is nonsense as we are all a combination of many factors; each factor may change in significance depending on the issue.

    Reply
    • 77. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 4:17 pm

      re: “a simplistic, exclusionary mindset”

      Yup, they live in a black and white world. They (Pakatan) are Light & Goodness while the BN is the Dark Side.

      And certainly exclusionary, if you’re not with them, then you must be “stupid” and “evil”.

      Reply
    • 78. Jade Emperor  |  May 11, 2015 at 7:24 pm

      Those who claim to be Malaysian First while rejecting a National Mainstream School must introspect into their motives and clarify their personal misgivings.

      Reply
  • 79. sirimuda  |  May 11, 2015 at 6:11 pm

    Needless to say Najib behest of East Malaysians at time of him withstanding ominous pressing issues LTH + 1MDB to put to its priorities right alike

    Reply
    • 81. Helen Ang  |  May 11, 2015 at 10:42 pm

      I believe BM should be the medium of instruction, just as Thai is the MoI in Thailand, Japanese is the MoI in Japan, Korean is the MoI in Korea etc.

      I rarely comment on Johor.

      Reply
  • 82. orangkampung  |  May 11, 2015 at 6:39 pm

    And the no. 1 on evangelista hate-list has put up his views on BM again –
    http://ridhuantee.blogspot.com/2015/05/ada-apa-dengan-bahasa-melayu.html

    Quote: “Bahasa adalah sebahagian daripada warisan dan sejarah negara. Apakah Malaysia tidak ada sejarahnya? Apakah asal-usul Malaysia berbilang bangsa sejak azalinya?”

    Reply
  • 83. I.D.A  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:44 am

    “mengaku firsters acuan sendiri memang banyak. jadi janganlah terbulu-bulu mengaku. cerminlah diri. kalau setakat nak mengaku, aku pun boleh mengaku hensem macam Rain, tapi walaupun berdiri dalam hujan seharian sampai kecut pun tak sama juga…,”

    salam tuan rumah. lama tak komen. baca saja. :)

    Reply
  • 84. HH  |  May 12, 2015 at 6:13 pm

    Quote: And you think Chinese are model Malaysians based on what – their love of Nasi Lemak Ayam, their civic consciousness, their patriotism (participation in the Defence Forces) and payment of income tax? Do share with us your criteria, please, if you’re implying an assertion.

    I’ve already given you the bare minimum on what constitute a model citizen. Just that I do not apply the rules selectively between the different races. The law of the land applies to all.

    Quote: Refusing or being unable to speak BM is one thing. Insisting that BM is useless and there’s no point to mastering it is another.

    Now that the bar is lowered from the initial insistence BM must flow smooth like water from the mouth, I concur with you.

    Quote: If you really think that the Chinese community is able to get their point through, then fine again. Negotiate for your church crosses. Why all the whinging and accusations?

    Refusing to understand is not the same as not understanding. Negotiate for church crosses? No need for under table negotiations had some people not taken the law into their own hands. Remember good citizen 101?

    Quote: I’ve already asked you several times already to pick/state any criterion that you believe can be the yardstick for identifying Malaysian-ness. Do please give us one or two – Nasi Lemak? Teh Tarik?

    Let’s not deviate from the official stand. Respecting the Constitution and abiding the law.

    Quote: So the Chinese in Malaysia plan to establish the autonomous ‘papacy’ of Jerusubang where there’s no need or use for BM because the sizeable (quarter of population) numbers is linguistically self-sustaining like Quebec in Canada, is it? Well, if you have such ambitions, don’t be coy and stop fudging about the separatism.

    Is that how you got it all scripted? Just be mindful some of your half-baked right wing camper can’t tell fiction from truth.

    Quote: Okay, so the 12.3 percent American blacks and 12.5 percent American Hispanics (totally a minority of 25% like the Chinese in Malaysia) unlike the low 0.6% – 3.7% figures you cite for Germany, Indonesia etc. need not speak English either?

    Learning English is most useful. In fact, Malaysians should brush up theirs. Especially those whom are overly complacent with the usage of National language which, incidentally is also their mother tongue. Think globalisation.

    Old video, but still relevant on the importance of English.

    Quote: So you agree that it is “racist” for Malays to expect the Chinese majority to speak BM with some minimal competence..

    Nope, not that. If a group of people is proudly standing by their claim (or agree) they view the superiority of their race above all else (even country), then it would fit the dictionary definition of racist. So why the indignation and foul crying?

    Reply
  • 85. Jelkgcf  |  May 12, 2015 at 8:48 pm

    It depends on the CONTEXT. When it is regarding chibai Ketuanan Melayu, NEP, UMNO, Perkasa, ISMA, and Helen Cunt… I am indeed CHINESE! And fucking proud of it.

    In all OTHER instances, I am A MALAYSIAN, first and last.

    And the ultras and go fuck themselves.

    Reply

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