Do the Chinese really need to be able to speak BM?

May 12, 2015 at 7:09 pm 42 comments

There is a long discussion thread in my yesterday’s posting – ‘7 out of 10 Chinese see themselves as Malaysian First, claims J-Star survey‘.

Below is one reader’s opinion. Commenting @ 2015/05/12 at 6:13 pm, HH asked me to “take a calculator and work out the percentage of minority in those countries” while additionally throwing in “everybody’s favourite, Indonesia as well”.

  • Turks in Germany – 3.7%
  • Chinese in Indonesia – 1.2%
  • Koreans in USA – 0.6%
  • Chinese in Malaysia – 24%

So, what do the figures tell us?

According to HH, mastering the national language for the above minorities, i.e. Turkish Germans, Chinese Indonesians and Korean Americans, is an “essential survival tool 101 in view of their low population where it is not sustainable for the minorities to strive on their own”.

HH believes that the example of the minorities above speaking their national language fluently is “hardly helpful in our current discussion” or Malaysian context. Or in other words, if the minority percentage is not small (0.6% – 3.7%) but instead rather significant (24%), then it sustainable for ethnic minority on their own even if the national language is sidelined.

Since HH has implied that the Chinese population in Malaysia – at 24 percent – may not require BM competency as a survival tool, I brought up a counter-argument with regard to the blacks and Hispanics in the USA. Together these two communities make up 24.8 percent of the American population, mirroring the percentage of Chinese in Malaysia.

I asked @ 2015/05/12 at 3:41 pm if the quarter-of-total-population blacks and Latinos in the USA “need not speak English either?” just like how the quarter-of-total-population Chinese in Malaysia are seemingly not required to speak BM.

HH‘s response @ 2015/05/12 at 6:13 pm cited “the importance of English”.

To my question – don’t the blacks and Latinos have to speak English, the language of the majority in the USA? – HH countered,

“Learning English is most useful. In fact, Malaysians should brush up theirs. Especially those whom are overly complacent with the usage of National language which, incidentally is also their mother tongue. Think globalisation.”

So now you’ve heard one side of the debate, i.e. that English is most important and useful.

What do the national language side have to say?

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42 Comments Add your own

  • 1. orangkampung  |  May 12, 2015 at 8:09 pm

    English is most important, no doubt about it. When you go to France, in the out of the way countryside, you will realise how important English is when you speak it really slow with hand signals to get your point across. When you walk into a diner in the middle of Nowhere, Oklahoma and everyone speaks to you really slow because they don’t really understand your supposedly good English. Or even in a place call Serian, Sarawak or Lenggong Perak, I’m sure people will understand your English especially if you put in a smattering Malay to make yourself understood.

    True story: at the government health centre I saw an elderly man being a translator for his young adult son who didn’t speak or understand Malay. Then mentioned it to a friend who worked at the hospital and he said that is quite common where he worked in Ipoh. Imagine a whole new young generation who cannot communicate with the majority.

    When I read HH’s comments, I can feel a simmering anger build up inside. It’s not that he didn’t put his points across well but it’s the fact he looked at the national language with such disdain and aversion. And yet he actually believed that he is Malaysian first.

    A friend who was on holiday met a Bangladeshi who worked in KL for a year then moved on to Italy. He worked at a food outlet. When he realised that my friend was Malaysian he started speaking in Malay and was happy to help my friend around. If that foreigner could learn a new language in the year he spent here and was happy to show his advantage in a faraway land, why are the Firsters so contemptuous of the Bahasa Kebangsaan?

    Reply
    • 2. RINA  |  May 13, 2015 at 12:24 am

      You travel to Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Hongkong and even Japan we do meet few locals who speak Bahasa Malaysia. Terus mesra dgn kita, they feel so proud kerana fasih bercakap dalam Bahasa Malaysia. Kat Angkor Wat restoran advertise their local dish “daging lembu naik bukit”.

      Apa la you ni HH.. As a Malaysian and not even proud of your own country’s national language, memalukan la.

      Malaysian Cantonese, Khek, Hokien etc speakers yg kalut sangat belajar Mandarin pasai apa? Bole bersungguh2 pulun sampai lotan2 anak kalau tak rajin belajar. Tell me why the need for them to formally learn how to read, write and speak in Mandarin? Here in Malaysia?

      Jangan dok temberang yang keturunan kamu asal usul are Mandarin speakers ya.

      Reply
      • 3. RINA  |  May 13, 2015 at 12:57 am

        This morning my Apek neighbour was complaining goods from China sekarang lambat sampai. Barang2 for his Hari Raya sales hingga kini sangkut kat kastam tak dapat clearance.

        Nah, kalau everything datang in foreign language, Apek nak explain atau tulis surat to kastam in Bahasa Kebangsaan kan payah sikit, translations perlu masa. Manatau satni ‘beras’ plastic pun tersilap impot masuk? Hari raya ramai suka buat nasi himpit, bahaya tau kalau tak teliti.

        Reply
  • 5. Jelkgcf  |  May 12, 2015 at 8:42 pm

    Well, I do speak Melayu when I order Nasi Lemak. Happy now?? Tiu.

    Reply
  • 6. beastofburden  |  May 12, 2015 at 9:32 pm

    To HH statment ,

    Will the chinese be willing to have a english education system (MCE&HSC) and give up their SRJK,Chan Wah, Chung Wah, etc.
    Are the chinese willing to give up the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) and just have mandarin language as a single subject.

    I Dont Think So.

    Reply
    • 7. Chris  |  May 14, 2015 at 12:38 pm

      People, my humble opinion is that we have to instill in everybody a unified Malaysian School identity foremost before we could ever substantiate our claims to being Malaysians first.

      Reply
      • 8. HH  |  May 15, 2015 at 10:55 am

        Beastofburden , Chris

        Quote beastofburden : Will the chinese be willing to have a english education system (MCE&HSC) and give up their SRJK,Chan Wah, Chung Wah, etc. Are the chinese willing to give up the Unified Examination Certificate (UEC) and just have mandarin language as a single subject. I Dont Think So.

        Considering both of you are basically advocating the same thing, then I will do a 2 in 1 response.

        If a unified schooling system is the answer to all our social and race problem, I have no objection.

        Why not?

        But is it?

        Any initiative to tackle other hard and politically unpopular issues like governmental policies, corruption, rising extremism and meritocracy?

        Accusing non-Kebangsaan schools as the only culprit resonate well with the masses because they ( non-kb) are convenient culprits. Tackling other contributing factors with good old honesty would mean some kind of obligations to be shared, concessions to be made, with the person in the mirror.

        Reply
  • 9. tebing tinggi  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:34 pm

    If the Chinese don’t want to speak or don’t Bahasa kebangsaan ,let’s them be ,the rest of Malaysian got nothing to lose anyway .

    If they want to remain as Chinese ,not Malaysian ,nothing that others can do ,is their choice anyway ,but does that shows how Malaysian they are ?.

    Language will be the tools of isolation .

    Reply
  • 10. Dandy  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:35 pm

    Why did you call the Afro Americans as Blacks? Your inner racism against people of other race by colour is so glaring.

    No wonder Malaysians speak of others as yellow, white, black, brown, snakes, pigs, monkeys, cows, parrots, buffalos, hippos etc.

    It would always be advantageous for anyone, living in any country to learn the language of the majority. Putting aside advantages like securing a Govt. job, business opportunities, entrance into public institutions etc, it also helps in communicating with others outside of one’s own race or community when staying together or travelling or entertainment.

    Likewise, English Language happens to be one of the world’s widely spoken and written language and Malaysians are also a part of the world community unless they prefer to live on another planet or stay at home for the rest of their lives. Besides, the greatest amount of information is in that language espeicially in a borderless world communicating via the internet for Science, Technology, business, trade, commerce etc. Even religious topics on all the major religions is written more in English Language than in any other languages.

    The myth that learning English will make someone an Englishman, learning Malay language will make one a Melayu, learning Mandarin will make one a Chinese, learning Hindi or Tamil will make one an Indian or even learning Arabic will make one an Arab must be the greatest joke ever propagated by racists and propagandists. There are just too many stupid myths to elaborate here touching on religion, character and even cultural identity.

    And the biggest myths are those propagated by politicians and quack educationists that unity, patriotism, loyalty is thru the adoption of a single language for a country. Isn’t this just pure hogwash.

    It is a big injustice to future generations to propagate such myths.

    Reply
    • 11. Helen Ang  |  May 12, 2015 at 11:00 pm

      re: “Why did you call the Afro Americans as Blacks?”

      Because they self-identify as black. Halle Berry, one of the most beautiful Hollywood stars – “I’m black, so I consider Nahla [her daughter] to be black” @ http://bossip.com/341094/halle-berry-im-black-so-i-consider-nahla-to-be-black/

      ‘Michelle Obama riles up graduates with black power speech’ @ http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2015/05/michelle_obama_riles_up_graduates_with_black_power_speech.html

      Headline in one of the world’s most renowned magazines – ‘Here’s who just unseated Oprah as the world’s richest black woman’ @ http://time.com/3649223/richest-black-woman-folorunsho-alakija-oprah-winfrey-nigeria/

      re: “Your inner racism against people of other race by colour is so glaring.”

      The fact that you attempt to grandstand on this just shows what kind of hypocrisy your DAP School of Democracy reeks of. Don’t forget that your party state newspaper Buletin Mutiara in its editorial called the mamaks “Melayu celup kopi”. Were you subconsciously projecting “your own inner racism against people of other race by colour”?

      re: “No wonder Malaysians speak of others as yellow, white, black, brown, snakes, pigs, monkeys, cows, parrots, buffalos, hippos etc.”

      Mostly hear this kind of language from your folks – the Dapsters.

      re: “The myth that learning English will make someone an Englishman, learning Malay language will make one a Melayu, learning Mandarin will make one a Chinese, learning Hindi or Tamil will make one an Indian or even learning Arabic will make one an Arab must be the greatest joke ever propagated by racists and propagandists.”

      Your argument is as disingenuous as saying that Malays rapuh iman and that’s the reason they object to kalimah Allah being used in the Bible. You build your own straw man (false argument to attribute to your opponent), and then you beat it up. Your line of argument – just like the “Malays are easily confused” trope – is rather insulting of one’s intelligence.

      re: “There are just too many stupid myths to elaborate here touching on religion, character and even cultural identity.”

      Is your inner prejudice showing, Dandy, in the way uols overuse the word “stupid”?

      re: “And the biggest myths are those propagated by politicians and quack educationists that unity, patriotism, loyalty is thru the adoption of a single language for a country. Isn’t this just pure hogwash.”

      Going by your logic, Japan, Korea, China, etc are all pure hogwash. Only DAP is pure holy water.

      re: “It is a big injustice to future generations to propagate such myths.”

      Methinks your future generations are applying to emigrate to Tasmania. If you fail once, try and try again.

      Reply
    • 12. RINA  |  May 13, 2015 at 1:10 am

      Mendiang MJ kalau tak silap written in his death certificate also use ‘Black’. Haiyaaa, people are proud of their own origins la.

      Reply
      • 13. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 1:41 am

        Dandy is Anak Bangsa Malaysia. He has no origin. He just “menjelma” here.

        Reply
  • 14. Native Language  |  May 12, 2015 at 10:56 pm

    Every country has its own “identity” in the form of a national flag, national song, including – you guessed it – a national language.

    Why do you think one of the absolute requirements for any country’s citizenship is the national language proficiency? Coincidently, this was one of the requirements when Chinese and Indians were granted Malayan citizenship.
    Other requirements also typically include loyalty and having a good conduct.

    If and only if fulfill them all, then only can be considered for citizenship. If fail at any one, don’t even bother applying.
    Don’t be surprised if some politicians will ask to requalify every Malaysian.

    Note: if you say English is important and THEREFORE no need to master the NATIONAL LANGUAGE, then this applies even more to Mandarin in Malaysia. The ministry of education has every right to cease supporting chinese schools – it IS against the Malaysian constitution anyway.

    Reply
  • 15. kampong lad  |  May 12, 2015 at 11:35 pm

    malaysian chinese, malaysian indian, malaysian first, don’t you see? i bet Helen is a chinese malaysian.

    Reply
  • 16. ingat  |  May 12, 2015 at 11:58 pm

    kenapa begitu angkuh tidak mahu belajar bahasa kebangsaan negara ini sedangkan nak jadi satu bangsa malaysia konon tapi menolak satu syarat utama rakyat negara ini
    ingat baik jika jepun tidak kalah perang dulu tidak akan ada masalah bahasa ni

    Reply
  • 17. HH  |  May 13, 2015 at 12:15 am

    The goal post has shifted I see.

    Quote:
    “So we can expect seven out of every 10 Chinese in the country to be able to speak Malaysia’s national language as their native tongue (just like the ethnic Chinese in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines do their respective country’s native language) and also be willing to send their children to National School.”

    My initial comment was a response to your assertion the Chinese ought to be as proficient in BM as their native tongue. ( like the Indonesian Chinese) The gist of it was, that. being your golden standard before they (the Chinese) earn their right to claim Malaysia first.

    But now the bar has gone much lower, eh? Let’s see, it is now titled ‘Do the Chinese really need to be able to speak BM?’

    Is it a fact the majority of Chinese not able to communicate in their National language? Think not. Taking into consideration BM to most non-Malays are a second language, it is not unreasonable to expect some latitude.

    As fluent as their native tongue? That’s a tall order.

    Finally, to answer your question, yes, the Chinese should learn to speak BM.

    Reply
    • 18. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 12:44 am

      re: “But now the bar has gone much lower, eh? Let’s see, it is now titled ‘Do the Chinese really need to be able to speak BM?’?”

      Yes, unfortunately. In this follow-up posting to the earlier one, the bar has had to been lowered to match your standards (low expectations) and expand the discussion.

      orang kampung believes that you have exhibited “contempt and aversion” to BM in your series of previous comments on the earlier ‘7 out of 10 Malaysian First‘ thread.

      Of course different readers may interpret what you say differently but I concur with orang kampung wrt your condescending tone about the status of BM, in relation to how well Chinese should learn how to speak it.

      You commented @ 2015/05/12 at 3:04 pm,

      “Disdain for the National language? Gee, where would folks get to practice their Bahasa after they leave school? Hang around Government offices? Maybe watch more Raja Lawak to dig their jokes. The point of a language is to enable communication. If someone is able to get their message through, then mission accomplished.

      “Let’s be frank, is fluent BM the real issue? Not able to communicate with others? in the age of iPads and mobile phones? What more, are Malaysians identified by their National language alone? Then the only eligible Chinese model candidate left that fits the bill to a T would be Ridhuan. Unless you want to nominate your good self.

      You commented @ 2015/05/12 at 8:53 am,

      Bahasa is the official medium for Governmental agencies/offices. Governmental recruitment policies and quotas in favor of the bumis further relegate the need to master BM for non-Malays to a bare minimum. Most non-Malays know the basic BM to get by their daily interactions with governmental offices or among Malay friends/colleagues. English is widely used in private firms.

      The reality is, the drive to master a langusge is mostly needs-driven. It is hardly learned as a patriotism showcase.

      You commented @ 2015/05/11 at 8:54 pm,

      “What I meant is, it is ‘failed logic’ to generalize the Chinese as doubtful firsters on account of their lack of fluent BM. Just as it is not apt to generalize on the majority of Muslims on account of those ISIS sympathizer.”

      You commented @ 2015/05/11 at 4:49 pm,

      “Irony aside, the implications would be a series of biases that could never be reconciled. One can nurture nationalism, but ethnicity is something one is born with. Can’t change that. You can talk like them, dress like them but you can never be one of them. That is the downside of divisions along ethnic lines. It is not inclusive and ‘ethnic first’ mentality meant lack of willingness to accept others as equal.”

      You commented @ 2015/05/11 at 1:07 pm,

      “Much prominence is placed, on ‘fluent bahasa’ as an impromptu prerequisite of sorts, upon the non-Malays as to what qualifiy them as Malaysian first. I don’t disagree the ability to speak fluent BM (and other languages) is a desirable trait, but to use that as a yardstick to measure one’s ‘Malaysian-ness’ ? The word shallow comes to mind.”

      Reply
      • 19. shamshul anuar  |  May 13, 2015 at 12:58 am

        Helen,

        The thing about The chinese is that they do not want to integrate. Period.

        They want to remain chinese .Yet Chinese politicians often lament why they are called “pendatang’. I told them they are labelled “pendatang” because they behave like “pendatang’.

        The situation is made worse under current leadership . Najib is simply “terhegeh hegeh’. He still does not understand that nobody respects him though he calls himself “ah jib Gor’.

        chinese are led to believe they alone can dictate the local political scenario. How wrong they could be

        Reply
        • 20. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 1:08 am

          They are Malaysian First, so how can you view them as pendatang and say they refuse to integrate? Furthermore, they put their nationality first while you put your ethnicity first.

          Reply
          • 21. shamshul anuar  |  May 13, 2015 at 7:22 am

            Helen,

            wise men said “the proof of pudding is in the eating”.

            Put their nationality first? Prove it with not opposing one school concept.

            Reply
        • 22. MCA.8481  |  May 13, 2015 at 3:17 pm

          They will only learn and use BM if there is money to be made. Case in point indo maid agents, they even speak with indo twang with their indo maid agent counterpart to ensure steady supply. Heck, bet they also learn rohingya now as boat ppl coming in drove now. Parasite!

          Reply
      • 23. HH  |  May 13, 2015 at 9:33 am

        Quote: “Yes, unfortunately. In this follow-up posting to the earlier one, the bar has had to been lowered to match your standards (low expectations) and expand the discussion.”

        Why should anybody’s Nationalism be sized up and queried, by your (or my) expectations apart from what is already defined in the Constitution?

        But of course moving the goalpost by lowering the bar would also chart the course of discussion to lead to your predefined narratives of the Malaysian Chinese refusing to learn BM, wherein your original contention was they (the Chinese) have to speak native- like fluent BM and attend Sekolah kebangsaan to qualify as true Malaysians.

        Wait, you don”t say, your blog, your like? Lol

        Reply
        • 24. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 10:55 am

          re: (I repeat) “this follow-up posting to the earlier one”

          Do you understand the meaning of “follow-up”? If the content and scope were to remain the same, then it wouldn’t be a follow-up, would it? It would be facsimile.

          re: “Why should anybody’s Nationalism be sized up and queried, by your (or my) expectations apart from what is already defined in the Constitution?”

          Article 152 of the Constitution says that bahasa Melayu is the National Language. Since you are harping on adherence to the FedCon as the barest minimum to being “Good Citizen 101”, then why can’t we query and size up the language competence of the Malaysian Firsters?

          re: “But of course moving the goalpost by lowering the bar …”

          How to keep the goalpost at the end of the field when even the DAP Yang Berhormats cannot speak BM properly much less the ordinary Hosannah Chungs, Hannah Yeohs and Joshua Tans? And you’ve already made it clear that BM competence is a low priority. Can I then force bahasa Melayu to “flow like water from your mouth”?

          re: “… would also chart the course of discussion to lead to your predefined narratives of the Malaysian Chinese refusing to learn BM wherein your original contention was they (the Chinese) have to speak native- like fluent BM and attend Sekolah kebangsaan to qualify as true Malaysians”

          Correct, I said that since they are thumping their chest as Malaysian Firsters, they should be able to speak our national language as the Chinese Indonesians and Chinese Thai do theirs, and attend SK.

          However, the discussion went into whether the Chinese have shown any willingness to master BM because it is YOU who has brought up the lack of importance and economic benefits of BM compared with the international languages.

          If you will go back to ‘7 out of 10 Malaysian First’ Comments section to refresh your memory.

          re: “Wait, you don’t say, your blog, your like? Lol”

          Yes, I do say. Cheers.

          Reply
          • 25. islam1st  |  May 13, 2015 at 9:23 pm

            ‘even the DAP Yang Berhormats cannot speak BM properly much less the ordinary Hosannah Chungs, Hannah Yeohs and Joshua Tans?’

            Haiyaa, they can’t even buat lepot polis right, I tell you…how many literally know the difference between, dilanggar or berlanggar?

            Reply
  • 26. Mustapha Ong  |  May 13, 2015 at 2:20 am

    Malaysia has achieved her national independence for the last 58 years and yet some of us still do not regard ourselves as 101% Malaysians based in our individual ethnic origins in Peninsula Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak. It is not that the BN government is at fault if one does not make a serious attempt to read and understand the Federal Consitution. Where does the Consitution state that the Chinese, Indians, and other ethnic races are “pendatang” and only the Malays and Bumiputras are original settlelers of this country? Only the extremist politicians from both sides of the political divide has raised this issue tantamount to racial discrimination and should be stopped. We should identify ourselves as “Malaysians” from our own ethnic groups. Period.

    Reply
    • 27. islam1st  |  May 13, 2015 at 9:25 pm

      I thought you dulu brag pasal being MELAYU, no meh?

      Reply
  • 28. TrulyMalaysian  |  May 13, 2015 at 8:14 am

    If you are truly Malaysian first then you must abide to the constitution which governs Malaysia. The constitution state that BM is the national language. As someone who abide to the constitution, you must then put efforts into learning it and must show some proficiency in speaking the language.

    I once met a steward in the Emirates Stadium (stadium for Arsenal FC in London). He was from Nigeria. When he saw me he immediately spoke BM with me. When I asked had he been to Malaysia before, he said that he only been to Malaysia for two weeks but he learned BM before he went to Malaysia just for the sake of learning. I also met a english bus driver in central london who lives in Malaysia for 6 years and can speak BM fluently. If these people can learn the language eventhough there is no real need for them to learn it, why can’t our parliment rep do it?

    Reply
    • 29. jentayu  |  May 13, 2015 at 10:51 am

      In some country like china they won’t entertain you if you speak languages alien to them. to hell if you’re try going there on free and easy mode and you’ll understand.

      even those awang hitam speak Chinese, not English like ours when dealing with the citizens. to the extend of speaking like the citizen themselves.

      while here we have this chap named HH who thinks speaking malay like a malay guy is a tall order, immigrants from various country like Pakistan, india, or Africa who migrate to Europe are able to speak properly once they get to 2nd generation.

      but in Malaysia, even a 4th generation immigrants is not able to communicate in BM fluently.

      Reply
      • 30. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 10:59 am

        re: “even a 4th generation immigrants is not able to communicate in BM fluently”

        Actually, some of the older Chinese (2nd generation) speak better BM than the younger Chinese (4th gen).

        Reply
      • 31. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 10:59 am

        re: “even a 4th generation immigrants is not able to communicate in BM fluently”

        Actually, some of the older Chinese (2nd generation) speak better BM than the younger Chinese (4th gen).

        Reply
        • 32. orangkampung  |  May 13, 2015 at 11:33 am

          And yet we don’t have a problem with first, second or whatever generation Malaysian Indians. I have yet meet an Indian who cannot speak Malay at all. They seem to be able to uphold the constitutional position of the malay language.

          Reply
          • 33. Helen Ang  |  May 13, 2015 at 11:40 am

            I’ve been mistaken for a Korean or Japanese by Malay strangers when I speak BM. They don’t come across a local Chinese who doesn’t speak broken BM, apparently.

            Reply
          • 34. AC-DC  |  May 13, 2015 at 5:21 pm

            “I have yet meet an Indian who cannot speak Malay at all. They seem to be able to uphold the constitutional position of the malay language.”

            Yet still, the Indians are considered ‘pendatang’.

            When they want to build a temple, some people jump up and down.

            Reply
            • 35. islam1st  |  May 13, 2015 at 9:29 pm

              Negara ini ada undang-undang maa. Kalau takdak permit, bina secara haram, surau pun kena roboh beb! Tu la lu paper talak baca, mana boleh tau punya!

              Makan, Minum, Mimpi ABU saja!

              Reply
            • 36. AC-DC  |  May 14, 2015 at 4:23 pm

              Si islam1st sudah lupa puak-puak yang bising tentang kuil yang diluluskan kerajaan di Putrajaya ke?

              Ataupun kuil yang diluluskan di Shah Alam di mana puak ekstrim pergi berarak membawa kepala lembu ke pejabat kerajaan negeri?

              Reply
        • 37. Noon  |  May 13, 2015 at 1:36 pm

          This phenomena could be seen mainly from the Chinese communities. Thats why there exist chinatowns all over the world.

          I heard in a talk by a US scholar about the same situation (with the same community) there. Even after 7 generations, some still could not master english language well enough.

          Reply
      • 38. islam1st  |  May 13, 2015 at 9:27 pm

        ‘immigrants from various country like Pakistan, india, or Africa who migrate to Europe are able to speak properly once they get to 2nd generation. ‘

        Kena buat exchange programme dengan ingrates!

        Reply
  • 39. alwieabdullah  |  May 13, 2015 at 11:42 am

    Orang Cina negara ini yang tidak peduli untuk belajar BM samalah dengan orang yang menidakkan pepatah di mana bumi dipijak, di situ langit dijunjung…
    Sebab itulah walau hidup mereka berpijak di bumi bertuah ini, mereka masih menjadikan langit negara China sebagai mimpi.

    Bukankah bangsa Cina itu satu bangsa yang budayanya amat mementingkan pelajaran? Bukankah BM itu sendiri satu pelajaran?

    Tidakkah menafikan pentingnya BM di bumi yang mereka tinggal ini jelas menunjukkan betapa benar mereka ini berbudaya ‘hidup untuk makan’… yang penting mesti jadi ‘kaya’ sebab nak mati pun kena ‘kaya’ jugak….

    kesiannya….

    Reply
    • 40. mek  |  November 24, 2016 at 11:08 am

      Sebagai seorang Cina yang bertutur bahasa Melayu sebagai bahasa ibunda, secara jujurnya saya pernah berjumpa sejumlah rakyat Malaysia berketurunan Cina yang acuh tak acuh dalam usaha menguasai bahasa Melayu kerana menganggap bahasa kita ini tiada nilai komersil. Belajar bahasa Melayu hanya untuk mendapat markah tinggi dalam peperiksaan konsepnya.

      Reply
  • 41. C72  |  May 13, 2015 at 11:55 am

    If they like to label others as “stupid”, hence they see themselves as very clever.

    If they are so clever, then why can’t they master multiple languages?

    Since there are supposedly “No (insert race here) , only Malaysians” , then surely they can be equally fluent in BM, Chinese (dialect + Mandarin) , Tamil, Iban dsb … right?

    BM is so easy to use, what’s the issue? I know a Scottish guy, a linguistics graduate, he told me BM was one of the easiest languages to pick up and he is literate in many, because of its logical construction and SVU grammar format (subject verb object) which is the same as English and Chinese.

    So, dear clever people, you have very little excuse not to be proficient…. unless you’re not that cl … never mind.

    Reply
  • 42. mek  |  November 24, 2016 at 11:05 am

    The ancestors of blacks in USA came from different parts of Africa and spoke different languages. Moreover, as slaves in those days, they and their children born in US had to speak in English, the language of the masters then. Blacks Americans today who constitute a sizeable proportion of the American population speak English as their own language and mother tongue as a result. Thus, black Americans fall into the same category as white Americans of English-speaking origin and should not be compared to the situation of Chinese Malaysians in this article’s context.

    This situation would be more equitably compared to the situation of Hispanic Americans. Hispanic Americans generally speak Latin American Spanish as their mother tongue. While many have learnt to speak English with varying degrees of fluency, about 30% of of all Hispanic Americans are not proficient in English including those who cannot speak English at all (Pew Research, 2013).

    However, the US scenario may not be such an apple-to-apple comparison since English is not the national language of the US. In fact, US has no national language officially proclaimed by their constitution or any law. At best, perhaps one could say that English is the de facto national language of the US. For Malaysia, the constitution states that Malay is the national language (as is the case with Singapore). The Malaysian society approaches this from various angles. Some argue that the state should not impose a national language on its citizens. Some argue that the citizens of a state having an officially proclaimed national language should make the best effort to master the language or, at the very least, speak it well. Objectively, Malay is the de facto language of communication best understood by most segments of the Malaysian population. By that virtue alone, Malaysian should learn to speak it well as language has the power to gel people together and build a sense of camaraderie that could very well lead to a more harmonious society.

    Reply

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