Myanmar election, Rohingya minority and a lesson for M’sia

November 9, 2015 at 11:48 am 37 comments

Myanmar held its general election yesterday where 30 million citizens out of a population of 53.7 million are eligible to vote. Only ¾ of the 664 seats in Parliament however are up for grabs as ¼ are reserved for the military, unelected.

The votes are being counted now. Aung San Suu Kyi leads the opposition National League for Democracy (NDL) and her party is expected to win. Nonetheless, she can’t become president even if it does.

In 2008, the military junta introduced a new constitution which included an article that says anyone who is married to a foreign citizen or whose children are foreigners cannot become president or vice president.

The prohibition is popularly believed to have been written with the view to bar Suu Kyi from ever ascending to the presidency. Suu Kyi’s late husband was an omputih (below) and furthermore, she has two British sons.

Aung San Suu Kyi

Restricted democracy and marginalized minority

In its FAQ guide to the Myanmar election, the New York Times raises the following question – How much influence does the military have?

The answer: A lot.

“The military appoints a quarter of all lawmakers, one of the three nominees for president, the powerful home minister, the defense minister and the minister of border affairs.”

More interesting for us is the following question – Will Myanmar’s ethnic minorities be able to vote?

According to the New York Times:

“Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority, have been excluded from voter lists this year amid a wider government-led effort to disenfranchise them.”

Rohingya

Native Burmans in Rakhine reject the Rohingya

Outgoing President Thein Sein, a former general, oversaw his government’s persecution of disenfranchised Rohingya ethnic minority, said the New York Times.

Thein Sein refuses to recognize the Rohingya and instead refers to them as Bengali, i.e. a pendatang race originating from the province of Bengal in the neighbouring Indian sub-continent.

“We will take responsibilities for our ethnic people but it is impossible to accept the illegally entered Rohingyas who are not our ethnicity,” Thein Sein is quoted as saying by the International Business Times in its article on 31 July 2012.

To put it simply, the president wants them to just go away.

Dapsters should note what the Myanmar President said above about the IMPOSSIBILITY of accepting immigrants who do not belong to the ethnicity and religion of the majority.

impossible

Rohingya – Myanmar’s stateless race and religion minority

The Rohingya are classified by the government of Myanmar as “stateless Bengali Muslims from neighbouring Bangladesh”.

Myanmar Immigration Minister Thein Htay said the Rohingya had no claim to citizenship and were not included among the country’s more than recognized 130 ethnic races. See ‘Rohingyas are not citizens: Myanmar minister‘ (The Hindu, 30 July 2012).

Estimated to number one million, many Rohingya were disenfranchised by the country’s 1982 Citizenship Act. In recent years, they’re the victims of communal violence.

Rohingya mugs

British colonial rule saddled Burma with unwanted immigrants

There was a mass migration of the Muslims from Bengal to Arakan/Rakhine as a transient workforce during the period of colonial economy. Rakhine, where the Muslims of Myanmar live, is a state bordering Bangladesh that was known as Arakan in the past.

According to the CIA Factbook, Myanmar has a four percent Rakhine ethnic minority (comprising both Buddhists and Muslims).

The Rohingya (above, below) emigrated to Burma following the opening of borders. They started entering Arakan following a series of British victories in the Anglo-Burmese wars in 1824-26, 1852, 1885.

In 1886, Burma was annexed to India as a province of the British India colonial empire and only separated from India in 1937. Burma becoming a British colony created the problem of unwanted immigrants belonging to foreign races.

la-fg-malaysia-rohingyas-20150510-001 Los Angeles Times

Lingering legacy of colonialism spanning future generations

In 1958 (one decade after Burma’s Independence in 1948), there were an estimated 700,000 Indian and 300,000 Chinese aliens in Burma. Both these races had been encouraged by the British to emigrate to Burma as cheap labour.

The Chinese in Burma had their own schools. See ‘Indians and Chinese in Burma‘ (The Atlantic magazine, February 1958 issue).

Unlike the Chinese and Indians in Malaysia, the Rohingya (below) in Myanmar do not have the right to vote despite having lived in the country for generations.

Rohingya fleing exodus

Anti-minority sentiments flare up into race riots

From March-May 1942, the Indians fled Burma in a big exodus after the Japanese invaded in World War Two. The Indians were expelled from Burma on large scale in 1962 after the junta seized power through a military coup.

Beginning the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, there were anti-Chinese riots in Burma. One of the consequences was the nationalizing of Chinese schools.

In the last and present decade, native sentiments have turned against the settled Muslims left in Myanmar since the Indians and Chinese have already largely gone away.

rohingya_reuters_0

Can’t speak Burmese, can’t become citizens

According to the Human Rights Watch in its open letter to President Thein Sein on 13 Jan 2015:

<Quote>

“Burma’s 1982 Citizenship Law states that ‘full’ citizens are members of named ‘national races’ (including Arakan, Burman, Chin, Kachin, Karen, Karenni, Mon, and Shan), or those whose ancestors settled in the country before 1823, the beginning of British occupation of what is now Arakan State. If individuals cannot provide evidence that their ancestors settled in Burma before 1823, and if they are not of a national race, the law denies them full citizenship.

“The law designates three categories of citizens: (1) full citizens, (2) associate citizens, and (3) naturalized citizens.

“Foreigners may become naturalized citizens if they can provide ‘conclusive evidence’ that they or their parents entered and resided in Burma prior to independence in 1948. Persons who have at least one parent who holds one of the three types of Burmese citizenship are also eligible to become naturalized citizens.

“Beyond this qualification, section 44 of the 1982 Citizenship Law requires that a person seeking to become a naturalized citizen must be at least 18-years-old, able to speak one of the national languages well (the Rohingya language is not recognized as a national language), of good character, and of sound mind. The UN Human Rights Committee has long expressed concern over stringent language criteria for citizenship.”

<Unquote>

Hannah Racist Ugly Mouth Hodoh

Umno should really start living up to its “racist”, “extremist” credentials

Muslims make up about five percent of the Myanmar population. Yet Suu Kyi’s NLD is not fielding any Muslim candidate, said Al-Jazeera in an Oct 29 feature.

Al-Jazeera said “15 Rohingya candidates were barred in August from running, again on account of their parents being ‘foreign-born’.” It also reported that about 700,000 people, mostly Rohingya, have been made ineligible when they were declared as holders of white cards’ who cannot vote.

Aside from the Rohingya, other Myanmar Muslims have also been sidelined from their country’s election process.

“In a September statement, the US State Department noted that Myanmar’s election commission had disqualified about 100 candidates, mostly Muslims”, said a Nov 3 Reuters report.

Myanmar’s Muslims are furthermore regarded by officialdom as either ethnic Indian or Pakistani.

“Increasingly, Muslims have been told to register their race as Indian or Pakistani, regardless of whether that is true, in order to obtain national registration cards, which are necessary for both voting and travel abroad.” – see ‘Myanmar: Muslims at risk of exclusion from historic election‘ (Christian Today, 3 Nov 2015).

Al-Jazeera opines, “The country has no reliable opinion polls, but it is expected that parties based along ethnic lines would win most seats”.

Something for Malaysians who are deeply in denial to chew on.

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37 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Surrhead  |  November 9, 2015 at 1:27 pm

    well……we can choose to become a nation like myanmar where they are still struggling on how to adapt humans of a different nation or we can keep progress like Canada or Australia where the skin color isn’t an everyday issue….
    http://www.ndtv.com/indians-abroad/india-born-steve-rai-becomes-vancouver-police-deputy-chief-773415

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_Wong

    Reply
    • 2. Helen Ang  |  November 9, 2015 at 2:47 pm

      Or you can also emulate the Americans of Indian origin.

      (a) The Governor of Louisiana’s parents emigrated from India. His birth name is Piyush Jindal but he goes by the all-American moniker ‘Bobby’ Jindal.

      His parents are Hindu but Bobby converted to Christianity.

      In Malaysia, you could convert to Islam and change your name to Ridhuan. That’s the Malaysian First template in the mould of Bobby Jindal’s success.

      (b) The Governor of South Carolina’s parents emigrated from Punjab. Her birth name is Nimrata Randhawa but she goes by the all-American moniker ‘Nikki’ Haley (Haley is her married name /husband’s surname).

      Her parents are Sikh but Nikki converted to Christianity a year after she married her husband who is a Methodist.

      In the Malaysian context, I bet you can’t tell me Tiara Jacquelina’s Chinese surname off the top of your head.

      As for Penny Wong, you can hear her speak English with an Australian twang. In the video here, she’s advocating gay marriage.

      When are the Chinese going to be able to speak bahasa Melayu?

      If the minorities in Malaysia want to “progress” as you say, how about following the path of the minorities in the developed countries like Bobby, Nikki and Penny.

      For starters, how about Kit Siang and Guan Eng taking on a local Malaysian name like how Bobby and Nikki Americanized their names. Nope, ‘Joseph’ doesn’t cut it. ‘Yusuf’ is acceptable though.

      Reply
      • 3. Surrhead  |  November 9, 2015 at 3:57 pm

        i see that you have gotten my point…….we are still harping on race and religion where else developed nations looks for leaderships qualities…..

        i googled for Tiara’s info….it comes with an Eu…

        Reply
        • 4. Helen Ang  |  November 9, 2015 at 3:58 pm

          I see that you’ve missed my point.

          Up to you all lah … keep denying.

          Reply
          • 5. Surrhead  |  November 9, 2015 at 6:58 pm

            check out his guy who manage to do well in australia….why is that?
            http://malaysiandigest.com/news/578148-malaysia-born-property-developer-keen-to-develop-city-in-malaysia.html

            He has a vision. do you think umno will allow it to happen without implementing ketuanan Melayu crap?

            But, then again, this guy is operating in a developed country….developed in a sense that the gov generally practices laws beyond race and religion.

            Reply
            • 6. Helen Ang  |  November 9, 2015 at 7:19 pm

              re: “a developed country … developed in a sense that the gov generally practices laws beyond race and religion.”

              USA got her independence on 4 July 1776.

              (a) Blacks were granted the right to vote on 3 Feb 1870. It took more than 93-and-½ years from the time of Independence for American blacks to obtain their right to vote.

              (b) American ethnic minorities won protection from racial discrimination through the Civil Rights Act signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on 2 July 1964. It took 188 years, from the time of their country’s independence, for the blacks to secure equal civil rights.

              (c) It took 232 years + 4 months from the USA’s Independence in 1776 before the first biracial American was elected President. And mind you, Obama ain’t even fully black. He’s half white. And nobody’s heard him speak Swahili.

              Reply
              • 7. HY  |  November 10, 2015 at 3:49 pm

                i am not sure if usa a good model for reference on civil, woman n minority rights, my view is that a), b) n c) shown that usa is not that democratic at one time. I think surrhead point is that we can choose to be more democratic, or less democratic.

                our constitution define what is a malay, thus I am not sure how speaking the best malay or adopt a malay name would make any difference. the fact is that lks, lge, hy n many dun speak chinese well. many baba nyonya dun live a chinese life, i think lky never perceive himself as chinese in his earlier life. I think the none chinese educated n baba nyonya finally realise no matter what they did, they r no diff with us who read n write chinese.

                Reply
                • 8. Helen Ang  |  November 10, 2015 at 4:33 pm

                  re: “i am not sure if usa a good model for reference on civil, woman n minority rights”

                  USA is the pole star for DAP because a minority succeeded in becoming president.

                  re: “I think surrhead point is that we can choose to be more democratic, or less democratic.”

                  Is the DAP more democratic when it appoints Malays who lost the vote (where did its much vaunted “meritocracy” disappear to suddenly)?

                  I thought ‘demokratos’ means “the power of the people”, and free and fair election, and therefore the results of elections – even a party election – must be respected and implemented. Same goes for Tony ‘No.8’ Pua being elected chairman.

                  re: “our constitution define what is a malay, thus I am not sure how speaking the best malay or adopt a malay name would make any difference.”

                  Dropping the “Insya Allah” word here and there, tweeting #sahur and wearing songlok & kain sampin to go to the surau to stir an empty pot would make no any difference either, or would it? You have to ask the Chinese tudung wearers …

                  BELOW:
                  Hannah Yeoh’s interns in their chameleon uniform

                  re: “the fact is that lks, lge, hy n many dun speak chinese well.”

                  The fact is that lks, lge, hy don’t speak any language well. Their BM and English are atrocious too while HY had to memorize her pinyin speech.

                  re: “I think the none chinese educated n baba nyonya finally realise no matter what they did, they r no diff with us who read n write chinese.”

                  The only difference would be pangkah Dacing or pangkah Roket in GE14.

                  Reply
                  • 9. Helen Ang  |  November 10, 2015 at 8:55 pm

                    ADD:

                    I meant LKS and LGE’s spoken English is bad. Their written English is alright.

                    Hannah Yeoh’s spoken English is better than the Lim’s but not all that great either. Those who speak English well are Najib & KJ.

                    Reply
                    • 10. Kineas1067  |  November 12, 2015 at 4:44 pm

                      Not the great majority of Umno politicians, Perkasa apparatchiks and the like! Fluency in English, I mean.

                      Who needs English anyway?

                      FDI and foreign investors are too much pandered too, anyway!

                      Let’s give them “what for”!

        • 11. grkumar  |  November 9, 2015 at 5:15 pm

          I must’ve missed something somewhere there Surrhead. Julia Gillard, Kevin Rudd, Tony Abbot, Malcolm Turnbull, Tony Blair, George Bush Snr and Jnr. Obama, Magaret Thatcher “Leadership?”. What are you drinking lad?

          “We” are not harping on race. It is the Non Malays who harp on race when convenient but want to be “Anak Bangsa Malaysia” whatever that means when not convenient.

          In Malaysia the difference between Malaysians and their south east Asian neighbours is the fact that you can continue to be China and Indian if you wish. You are able to have your places of worship and not lose your place in society. You can have your vernacular schools and cultural institutions not change your name or your “race” without a cost to your freedoms and rights.

          Malaysians of Indian and Chinese decent who complain ought to be horse whipped first for their willful blindness to the prosperity and freedoms they enjoy over their kin in the neighbourhood.

          Aung San Su Kyii will not win any landslide. She is hopeful as is the west for her. They will now begin the destabilization process after she utters the magic words ” “election fraud”.

          She is as much a racist asnthe generals. She is as much as them a person who believes she has a right to rule. She dumped her family. It was not a case of the military not letting her go according to her guardian and mother in law. She is a cold ambitious mercenary being every bit as she says “her father’s daughter”.

          The military is no good. No different to any government in Thailand or Singapore. But they are no worse than her. She refused to stand up for the Rohyinga. She is not particularly liked by the Shan or the Karen. She is popular in Yangoon amongst the trendies with foreign connections. Very good media management.

          She is Britains and the US’s most popular candidate not the most popular candidate of the Burmese. Thats where the danger lies.

          Reply
          • 12. The Kineas  |  November 9, 2015 at 7:59 pm

            I am not sure that the Indians in Singapore and Thailand are doing too badly. Or the Malays in Singapore, for that matter.

            As for Myanmar, early indications are that the NLD party is heading for victory.

            In Bihar in India, the voters have dealt a decisive defeat to Modi’s BJP party and it’s attempt to capitalise on the right wing Hindu lobby.

            In Sri Lanka, the new government has embarked on a policy of national reconciliation and the reintegration of the ethnic Tamil minority after years of discrimination by the Sinhalese majority.

            Which part of the above don’t you understand?

            Maybe you are the one who should be “whipped”?

            Hahaha……

            Reply
            • 13. grkumar  |  November 12, 2015 at 10:39 am

              Its clearly not a “landslide” as you have “predicted” for Aung San Suu Kyii. It is not a victory for Aung San Su Kyii either. She has not overcome the constitutional injunction on her attainting or reaching the highest office in the land which she aspires to.

              There is still a portion of parliament and the seats within it reserved for the military. Put that into the equation and you have a near simply majority.

              The NLD has constituent members who are part of a coalition of other divergent ideologies and regional and ethnic interests that have no similarities or common ground with Aung San Su Kyii’s own ideas and agendas for “her Myanmar”. The objects of the other parties in her coalition which is what it is, do not form part of a universal ideology or coalesce or give her hollow “landslide” as you refer to it as the power it needs to exercise that “landslide, save for the narrow common interest in diluting the power of the army. That will not happen. Not at least for the next 5 years.

              The west and Myanmar’s regional neighbours need the army and a strong army at that to contain the ambitions of the regional powers and neighbours like China who have evinced an intention to annex the northern parts of Myanmar claiming it as part of Greater China.

              Then there is the Rohyinga threat to go it alone and create another separate state within Myanmar. It has the tacit support of the Muslim world and Bangladesh. And that won’t be something that Aung San Su Kyii can contain. It is what the west wants of her in the end that matters.

              With her inconsistencies and shifting values and policies and the cult like status and following she has engineered around herself, this victory will be claimed by more than Aung San Su Kyii.

              Your response to the position of the Chinese and Indians by comparing the position of the Malays, in Singapore and the Indians and Chinese in Malaysia is weak and a diversion.

              In fact you support the point I have made in my above posting.

              Reply
              • 14. Kineas1067  |  November 12, 2015 at 4:40 pm

                When is a “landslide” not a “landslide”?

                In some parallel universe where simple maths doesn’t apply?

                The Myanmar military arrogated the 25% arbitrarily to itself? Did it seek popular approval for this move? Did it seek approval to arbitrarily dismiss the results of the last “free election” as an aberration?

                Are you saying that the actions of the Myanmar military are justified or that the power of the gun transcends all?

                At least we now know where you are coming from!

                Reply
              • 15. Kineas1067  |  November 13, 2015 at 8:55 am

                Oh, btw, the Singapore Straits Times (your favourite newspaper, no doubt) carried an AFP/Reuters report that was titled “Myanmar poised for smooth transition”.

                The Myanmar election tally as of Nov 12 showed that the NLD has won 196 out of the 243 seats declared in the Lower House, 95 out of 116 seats in the Upper House and 314 out of 380 seats in the states and regions.

                How does your maths account for this?

                Reply
                • 16. grkumar  |  November 13, 2015 at 5:18 pm

                  Your maths your figures you account for it. I have provided my explanations and analysis and if you can’t figure out from that keep trying or join the Harvest Church. Their maths is a bit like yours. Landslids

                  Reply
                  • 17. Kineas1067  |  November 13, 2015 at 6:42 pm

                    Ducking and evading the issue, are you? Why am I not surprised? It’s a typical modus operandi for operatives like you who resort to red herrings when confronted with the truth?

                    And bringing in (City) Harvest Church is another pathetic attempt to change the agenda.

                    I repeat – when is an election landslide victory not a landslide victory? Like the BN’s victory in the last GE?

                    Are you saying that BBC and Reuters got their facts wrong?

                    Or when Obama spoke to the Myanmar President yesterday, it was just two golfing buddies comparing notes?

                    Your “explanations” and “analysis” have evaporated because you cavalierly dismissed Aung San Su Kyii and the NLD as piffling entities of no consequence.

                    You must be finding the egg on your face a tad indigestible, wouldn’t you say?

                    Reply
      • 18. Kineas1067  |  November 9, 2015 at 4:52 pm

        Bobby J and Nikki H aren’t bilingual? You might want to get on their Facebook pages and Twitter feeds and ask them whether they are monolingual, bilingual or even multilingual.

        If they converted from the Hindu and Sikh faiths to Christianity, so what? It’s their choice, isn’t it?

        Of course, the US being secular and all, “freedom of religion” means exactly that. Like Christians being able to convert to Islam and Muslims being able to convert to Christianity. Or being LGBT and being able to enlist and serve in the US Armed Forces.

        Of course, that is only possible in the US. Ok, maybe also in other Western countries.

        As for fluency in BM, which is an often belaboured point, it is great for “integration”. “Assimilation”? Maybe not.

        And Lim Kit Siang and Lim Guan Eng aren’t “Malaysian” names? Like “Helen Ang” apparently is?

        Reply
        • 19. Helen Ang  |  November 9, 2015 at 5:19 pm

          re: “Bobby J and Nikki H aren’t bilingual?”

          Bobby and Nikki don’t address their constituents in Hindi and Punjabi, do they?

          And they don’t speak the language used in Congress (they were both ex-Congressmen) the way MPs from DAP mutilate the language used in Dewan Rakyat. The difference in their level of proficiency in the language of the House is ibarat langit dengan bumi.

          re: “You might want to get on their Facebook pages and Twitter feeds and ask them whether they are monolingual, bilingual or even multilingual.”

          Nobody’s stopping anybody from being multilingual. Mukhriz speaks Japanese. We’re talking about proficiency in the national language that is demanded of any citizen of any country, and more so of Yang Berhormats. Go to YouTube – there are clips of how bad the DAP reps in BM.

          re: “If they converted from the Hindu and Sikh faiths to Christianity, so what? It’s their choice, isn’t it?”

          Do you think Barack Obama could have become President if he was a Muslim?

          I wouldn’t question Bobby & Nikki’s reasons for converting but insofar as politicians go, how high up can a minority faith representative rise in the USA? Can a Muslim become Secretary of State? Secretary of Defence?

          So let’s not pretend that Malaysia is some sort of oppressive tyranny.

          The Dapsters demand for equality would not be entertained anywhere else in the world when they’re of a different race, different religion, different culture and can’t even speak the lingua franca and WCW dare invoke “commonalities“.

          In fact, I doubt that any other country in the world would tolerate the Dapster evangelistas and their behaviour. They’d be treated like the Rohingya and made stateless.

          re: “Of course, the US being secular and all, ‘freedom of religion’ means exactly that.

          Malaysia is not a secular country. Try changing the Constitution first before you make demands.

          re: “Like Christians being able to convert to Islam and Muslims being able to convert to Christianity.”

          Are you advocating for the right of Muslims to convert out? Why don’t you ask the DAP to make this stand explicit?

          re: “Or being LGBT and being able to enlist and serve in the US Armed Forces.”

          Ditto. If you support LGBT, then ask the DAP reps to speak for it like Penny Wong did.

          re: “Of course, that is only possible in the US. Ok, maybe also in other Western countries.”

          You might wanna answer islam1st’s question pertaining to your passport status.

          re: “As for fluency in BM, which is an often belaboured point, it is great for ‘integration’. ‘Assimilation’? Maybe not.”

          Of course not. It is Nasi Lemak that is the great common denominator and integrative element, innit?

          re: “And Lim Kit Siang and Lim Guan Eng aren’t ‘Malaysian’ names? Like ‘Helen Ang’ apparently is?”

          Helen Ang does not promote herself as Bangsa Anak Malaysia nor propogate Malaysian First. The last I recall, the name of the Jakarta Governor is Basuki Tjahaja Purnama. His name doesn’t sound Chinese to me.

          Reply
          • 20. Kineas1067  |  November 10, 2015 at 3:47 pm

            “convert out”? As opposed to “convert in”?

            But I get it. In the US (and in some other countries) you can do just that. It must be mighty uplifting to witness “freedom of religion” practised in the full sense of the phrase.

            As for my passport status, I think that islam1st has already conceded the issue, seeing as he or she is no longer making a song and dance about it.

            And you make a great play about “equality”. Is that an alien concept for you? But no worries, the US goes on it’s merry way; never mind if Malaysia is tagging along clutching to Uncle Sam’s coat tails.

            As for Bobby J and Nikki H, they are what they are. As too is Ahok. And Thaksin Shinawatra!

            But “Helen Ang”? A permissible riff? For an assimilated Malaysian?

            Reply
            • 21. Helen Ang  |  November 10, 2015 at 4:05 pm

              re: “In the US (and in some other countries) you can do just that. It must be mighty uplifting to witness ‘freedom of religion’ practised in the full sense of the phrase.’

              Does the DAP plan to impose this, and other, freedoms on Malaysia ala its Sekolah Demokrasi model?

              re: “As for my passport status, I think that islam1st has already conceded the issue, seeing as he or she is no longer making a song and dance about it.”

              I’ll wait to hear from him on this (conceding the issue).

              re: “And you make a great play about ‘equality’.”

              When did I? On the contrary, the status of Islam is not equal to the status of Buddhism in Myanmar while the status of Christianity is not equal to the status of Islam in Malaysia. Do the DAP evangelistas get this yet?

              re: “Is that an alien concept for you?”

              Are you saying all religions are “equal” or should be made equal in Malaysia?

              re: “But no worries, the US goes on it’s merry way; never mind if Malaysia is tagging along clutching to Uncle Sam’s coat tails.”

              You want us to follow the ‘secularism’ of the West?

              re: “As for Bobby J and Nikki H, they are what they are. As too is Ahok. And Thaksin Shinawatra! But ‘Helen Ang’? A permissible riff? For an assimilated Malaysian?”

              Show me where I’ve claimed to be “an assimilated Malaysian”. I thought I’d said China is our motherland or did you miss reading those posts?

              Reply
              • 22. Kineas1067  |  November 11, 2015 at 4:19 pm

                Well, aren’t all religions “equal” in the eyes of, say, the UN? Does the UN espouse “official” religions?

                Is Christianity the “official” religion in the US, Canada, Australia, the UK, Germany, France and other Western countries? They make a play about “Christian heritage” (and how that is supposedly under “threat” from Islam brought in by Muslim immigrants and refugees), but that is not the same as stating that their “official” religion is Christianity and backing it up with the full force of the law.

                If you are saying that all religions are not “equal” in Malaysia, you are articulating the status quo. Fair enough.

                It’s curious, though, that the Creator God (or The Almighty) has chosen (in human interpretation, at least) one religion over the others. The West, it seems, moved on from this a long time ago into a more rational and secular environment. Which is why it is being mocked (and, in some cases, targetted) for being secular, immoral and in terminal decline.

                As for the “secularism” of the West, isn’t the secular lifestyle (and the products thereof) already making inroads into Asian countries? The pervasiveness of Western “soft power” is apparent in the habits and mores of the younger generation and the millenials in these countries. Malaysia is not an exception.

                Tagging on to the coat tails of the US is, alas, a strategic necessity for the country. Unless you prefer for the country to fall under the sway of China (quite possible) or India (unlikely)?

                It is interesting that you claim that you are not an “assimilated Malaysian”. What are you then? A Malaysian of Chinese ethnicity with a Christian first name? Or have you disclaimed the Chinese ethnicity part in favour of being labelled “100% Malaysian”?

                Reply
                • 23. Helen Ang  |  November 11, 2015 at 4:38 pm

                  re: “It is interesting that you claim that you are not an ‘assimilated Malaysian’.”

                  I did not claim anything. It is you who made the claim on my behalf. I asked you to show where it is that I ever made any such claim as you’re asserting. Since you’re unable to cite any link, it’s clear that you’re a spinner.

                  re: “What are you then? A Malaysian of Chinese ethnicity with a Christian first name?”

                  Don’t pretend you don’t know Greek mythology. Helen predates Christianity and is a Western )not necessarily = Christian) name.

                  re: “Or have you disclaimed the Chinese ethnicity part in favour of being labelled ‘100% Malaysian’?”

                  You’re spinning again. What is it with you people?! I’ve stated “Aku Cina” and “I’m Chinese” many times. I’ve never called myself bangsa Anak Malaysia. I’m not a proponent of Malaysian First, and yet you can come up with this line.

                  As for the rest of your comment, if you want the other side of the political divide to oppose Article 3, then just say so.

                  Reply
                  • 24. Kineas1067  |  November 11, 2015 at 5:07 pm

                    Ah, yes, “Helen of Troy”. Wasn’t she the lady who left her husband and followed a handsome prince back to Troy, thereby precipitating the Trojan War?

                    But there also was a Saint Helena (or Saint Helen), the mother of Emperor Constantine of the Byzantine empire.

                    Greek or Christian antecedents – take your pick.

                    As for “spinning”, aren’t you the one tying yourself in knots? “Bangsa Anak Malaysia” is a non-starter? How about “child of Chinese Malaysian”?

                    But I digress.

                    As for “Article 3”, note my comment about the “status quo”.

                    Btw, didn’t you pick up my comments about “coat tails” and the pervasiveness of “soft power”?

                    Reply
                    • 25. Helen Ang  |  November 11, 2015 at 5:32 pm

                    • 26. Kineas1067  |  November 12, 2015 at 4:48 pm

                      Rendered temporarily speechless, are we? What happened to your vaunted verbosity?

                      Helen of Troy, according to what I’ve read, was certainly not at a loss for words.

                      Come to think of it, the Greek Pantheon were verbose with it. Especially when meddling in the affairs of mere mortals.

    • 27. Helen Ang  |  November 9, 2015 at 2:47 pm

      Or you can also emulate the Americans of Indian origin.

      (a) The Governor of Louisiana’s parents emigrated from India. His birth name is Piyush Jindal but he goes by the all-American moniker ‘Bobby’ Jindal.

      His parents are Hindu but Bobby converted to Christianity.

      In Malaysia, you could convert to Islam and change your name to Ridhuan. That’s the Malaysian First template in the mould of Bobby Jindal’s success.

      (b) The Governor of South Carolina’s parents emigrated from Punjab. Her birth name is Nimrata Randhawa but she goes by the all-American moniker ‘Nikki’ Haley (Haley is her married name /husband’s surname).

      Her parents are Sikh but Nikki converted to Christianity a year after she married her husband who is a Methodist.

      In the Malaysian context, I bet you can’t tell me Tiara Jacquelina’s Chinese surname off the top of your head.

      As for Penny Wong, you can hear her speak English with an Australian twang. In the video here, she’s advocating gay marriage.

      When are the Chinese going to be able to speak bahasa Melayu?

      If the minorities in Malaysia want to “progress” as you say, how about following the path of the minorities in the developed countries like Bobby, Nikki and Penny.

      For starters, how about Kit Siang and Guan Eng taking on a local Malaysian name like how Bobby and Nikki Americanized their names. Nope, ‘Joseph’ doesn’t cut it. ‘Yusuf’ is acceptable though.

      Reply
  • 28. Mulan Malaysia  |  November 9, 2015 at 3:05 pm

    Remember this? Throwback.

    Reply
    • 29. HH  |  November 9, 2015 at 5:22 pm

      Mulan

      And how is this relevant?

      Reply
      • 30. Mulan Malaysia  |  November 9, 2015 at 7:51 pm

        Both have common themes. Ours “Banglas” and theirs “Rohingyas”. Somehow these people are trapped in by both election campaigns.

        Reply
        • 31. Indian  |  November 10, 2015 at 8:52 am

          Sorry Helen, lari topik sikit.

          Mulan, have you looked at KOMTAR from afar lately?

          Seems like Tokong’s extending it upwards! Can see cranes and superstructure on the roof of Chong Keat’s phallic symbol.

          Heh heh…Tokong feeling inadequate kot?

          Reply
  • 32. Kineas1067  |  November 11, 2015 at 7:38 pm

    I note that “grkumar” has gone curiously quiet on the subject of Aung San Su Kyii and “landslide”.

    Why? Is he having second thoughts about his thesis?

    Or have the brave Myanmar voters proved him wrong?

    What parallels is he going to draw now?

    Reply
    • 33. grkumar  |  November 12, 2015 at 12:56 pm

      Further to what I have already commented on in response to your ‘brave Burmese voting” I draw your attention to Yale University’s studies into the careful way in which the voting population in Myanmar favours the largely Burman (largest ethnic group) population whilst ignoring the rights to vote of “temporary citizens” (citizens and ethnics from areas in conflict) who were by and large excluded from the voting process.

      Adding to this was the exclusion of the Rohyinga another “white card” group whose exclusion the “Brave Aung San Suu Kyii” said nothing about yet complaining about her exclusion from the highest office in the land by virtue of her dual citizenship amongst other breaches by Burmese law. Her children and late spouse were both foreigners.

      The victory (or landslide as you describe it) is further rendered hollow by the military’s hold on 25% of parliamentary seats which ensures the constitution will not be changed readily to allow her to be Prime Minister. It needs more than a 75% majority for that.

      Therre is more to come. I am not silent. Just busy going ghrough the motional garbage peddled by your group of NGO’s funded from abroad.

      Reply
    • 34. grkumar  |  November 12, 2015 at 7:56 pm

      Now in desperation you moving off topic. Not that you were at any time at all before. But let me indulge you further.

      Of the so called 80% of the popular vote she claims not all of it belongs to her. There are the ethnic groups in a diverse and disunited Myanmar. There are those not Burman who have been excluded. White cards. There is the Rohingya.

      If the army appropriated to themselves the 25% they hold how is that unlawful. They were the de jure government for over a decade. It was their right even if what they did was unpopular.

      Marcos, the Thai military juntas, Suharto and the Indonesian army all seized power through means other than through the ballot box. None were declared illegal or illegitimate (if they were it was not for long). SO whats the point you make about “landslides”.

      When is a landslide a landslide? Well I recall Harold Wilson’s statement in 1966 about winning government. All it takes is one vote. One vote more than the opposing party. It is all about strategies, it is all about tactics.

      And by the way of the 50 odd million in Myanmar it was not 35 million who voted. It was a far lesser number than that. But I suppose your NGO crowd has “better and more reliable information” than anyone else. You stick to your version of event I will to mine.

      Vive la difference

      Reply
      • 35. Kineas1067  |  November 13, 2015 at 6:56 pm

        Close but no cigar, as they say.

        This election in Myanmar was conducted under the military-drafted Constitution, with the 25% arrogated to the military on their say-so. Did the military secure this 25% by popular mandate or by winning a nationwide referendum?

        Did the military government that arbitrarily dismissed the results of the last election in Myanmar do anything to resolve the Rohingya issue? Or the Shan issue?

        It took US and EU sanctions to drag the Myanmar military to the negotiating table. Without that, the campaign of repression in Myanmar would have continued.

        As for Marcos and Suharto, what were their fates? Marcos was forced to step down and flee the Philippines. Suharto was forced to step down from power. As for the Thai junta, they will remain in power as long as the US is willing to let things be.

        Oh, btw, what constituencies does the NLD represent? Are they any more representative than, say, the BN coalition in Malaysia, the BJP in India or the Conservative Party in Britain?

        Vive la difference, but time and history will pass judgment on who are the winners and who are the losers.

        Reply
        • 36. grkumar  |  November 14, 2015 at 5:18 am

          You only needed to print the last statement you make here. It is the only one thats relevant. History will indeed determine who the real winners are.

          The rest of it is a politically immature rant. I don’t need to show you what you seem to conveniently ignore in all of the rest (which I hope it is for your sake).

          As for the cigar (and the beer) it would be a good place chewing on one drinking the other to hear you out. Not otherwise!

          Reply
  • 37. I am Woman  |  November 14, 2015 at 12:37 am

    Since this is a subject on elections, here’s something interesting- http://gerakan-anti-pkr-new.blogspot.my/2015/11/angka-luar-biasa-pemindahan-alamat.html

    Reply

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