The creepy folks who wanna “fix” Malaysia

January 8, 2016 at 10:34 pm 53 comments

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Let's fix Malaysia

Wrote May Wan Wong in The Heat, ‘Let’s fix Malaysia‘ (20 Dec 2015):

“I vacillate wildly between being so disgusted with the government – that I google ‘how to migrate to the UK’ – and so fiercely protective of my country, that I believe with every fibre of my being that my duty is to change my country to the one I want for future generations.”

walking cat

TalentCorp should UBAH scope of work

Perhaps TalentCorp could help Ms Wong secure a job in the UK.

As well as assist other Firsters in their applications for permanent residence in Tasmania and their other dream destinations.

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Entry filed under: Anak Malaysia. Tags: , .

Angry Chinese still bitter, resentful even after all these years PAS to expose DAP’s alleged ties with enemies of Islam

53 Comments Add your own

  • 1. anonymous  |  January 8, 2016 at 11:31 pm

    You really like that cat gif.

    Reply
    • 2. Helen Ang  |  January 8, 2016 at 11:36 pm

      Yup, making it my blog mascot.

      Reply
  • 3. grkumar  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:37 am

    Funny how none of these martyrs and do gooders who want to change their country are anything like that change they want to see in their country.

    Reply
  • 4. Equalizer.  |  January 9, 2016 at 1:07 am

    Very simple. In every country rich or poor, people move around looking for greener pastures, some for other reasons. Maybe a thousand reasons, we may not know. In this modern world with easier access to various modes of transportation, more people will move around until they find their dream land.

    What I am trying to say is this to all Malaysians out there who hated so much all about Malaysia. If you feel Malaysia is not for you, then what are you waiting for? Why are you cursing and degrading your own country to others? Who is stopping you to migrate? Why must you go around to condemn and saying you are ashamed to admit you are a Malaysian? Malaysia won’t cry if you successfully migrated. Don’t look back, just go. Malaysia will be happier.

    If other country do not want you, as such you failed to migrate then it means you are not suitable and qualify to be their citizen. Then you should be thankful that Malaysia still accept you. Sometimes you should stand in front of a big mirror and ask why you are not qualified.

    “Let’s fix Malaysia”. This is a typically jewish trained psychological sabotage coined sentence having doubled meaning which is a double edged sword.They have many of their trained dogs running around in Malaysia, now wanting to fix Malaysia. How? Economically and politically I am sure. Spreading lies, hatreds and cursing and condemning Malaysia as their everyday hobby. We all must understand this psywar created and promoted by them . UMNO/BN should activate their counter-psywar machineries by now but I think they are still “sleeping” as I can’t see any indication of counter strike.

    Reply
    • 5. psychopathic machinations  |  January 9, 2016 at 9:39 am

      Sleeping on the job and dreaming rich, creating nightmares for man on the street.

      Reply
    • 6. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 10:10 am

      ” Who is stopping you to migrate? ”

      Hmmn…Qualifications could be one thing, age could be another. Most countries will not accept anyone above 45. Think so easy to migrate one, is it?

      This attitude of if you don’t like it then leave is actually pretty pathetic. By doing this, you are alleviating any blame that should be rightfully placed on the government. Try to fix it first, if you can’t and an opportunity to emigrate arises, then jump at it. But bear in mind, most people will not qualify to emigrate.

      Reply
      • 7. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 11:10 am

        So you’re saying that the Kiwi and Aussie gov rejected your PR applications because you’re a nothing ? And now your only respite is to fix Malaysia ? You admit that you’re a nothing then ?

        Reply
        • 8. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 11:47 am

          Learn to read la genius. When did I ever say that? Butthurt much?

          Btw, I have had a kiwi pr for over 15 years due to having lived there as a child for a few years. Waiting on my Aussie one which should be approved anytime soon.

          Reply
          • 9. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:25 pm

            Oh come one now. You think people are going to believe you ?

            Reply
            • 10. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:29 pm

              Do you honestly think I care if someone like you believes me?

              Reply
              • 11. Islam1st  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:18 am

                Haiyaa. Then keep your berambus story to yourself laa. You think we really want to know meh? You think Malaysia will cry for you meh? Delusional. Keep dreaming.

                Reply
                • 12. Where's The Justice  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:19 am

                  Are you ever going to post more than a couple of lines? You’re boring, brader.

                  Reply
                  • 13. Islam1st  |  January 11, 2016 at 8:03 pm

                    Got you tak senang duduk what. How interesting, ‘boring stuff’ apparently rocks your world(view)? Lead a boring life aren’t you?? It shows.

                    Reply
  • 14. I Am Woman  |  January 9, 2016 at 9:48 am

    They are probably the same people who want to fix:
    1. Global warming by switching on the air condintioning
    2. Housing problem by levelling all the hills and building million ringgit homes
    3. Transport problems by putting more cars on the road
    4. Corruption problems by offering money to the law enforcers when faced with offenses.

    We can all see how well they are fixing the garbage, water etc problems in Selangor.

    Reply
  • 15. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 9:50 am

    Hmm…….let’s fix Malaysia. This sounds exactly what people like WTJ would say. WTJ still waiting for the Kiwi and Aussie gov to grant him PRs ? Fix Malaysia ? Sounds more like they have had their brains fixed by the holy juice beverage merchants.

    Complaining about opportunities denied because of race, religion etc. What are they smoking ? Weed ? Or Holy Vape ? I know of Malays who were denied opportunities not because they are opposition supporters but because they didn’t want to have anything to do with the current regime. They didn’t complain. They just move on. I also know of Chinese folks in their 50s who have had opportubities denied because of the NEP abd they didn’t complain about how bitter it was to be denied. They moved on. There were no shouts of ‘let’s fix Malaysia’.

    Complaining about lost opportunities, being denied because of race and religion. These are old stories. Urban legends. I will tell you, as what me and my friends have said many times. Opportunities, whatever it is that makes your life a success, it all comes down to social mobility, and social mobility emanates from education. You get yourself a good education from a good school and you set yourself free. That’s why we have parents willing to spend a fortune on their children’s education so that their kids can have a fighting chance in life. At the same time, we also have parents who could care less what their children do, just showering them with money so that their children can do whatever they want. It is this latter group now making the loudest noise saying that Malaysia must be fixed. They are damaged goods because their parents indulged them all sorts of luxuries now that the atmosphere no longer favors them they go on a mini rampage to vent their frustration.

    Talentcorp is useless. It is a vessel to ship home the most toxic anti Malaysia elements and as we are seeing today, we have a bitterly divided society thanks to these toxic degenerates. If these people are indeed men and women of exceptional talents their host countries would do anything and everything within their means to keep them. As we can see, these host countries must be relieved that some country is willing to take these people. That should tell you something it if hasn’t.

    Reply
    • 16. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 10:45 am

      “Hmm…….let’s fix Malaysia. This sounds exactly what people like WTJ would say. WTJ still waiting for the Kiwi and Aussie gov to grant him PRs ? Fix Malaysia ? Sounds more like they have had their brains fixed by the holy juice beverage merchants. ”

      Forgive me for not wanting to be screwed over anymore and to pay a premium for daily goods and services. Maybe you can afford the current cost of living, many in this country can’t.

      Stupidity really knows no bounds…

      Reply
      • 17. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 11:15 am

        I thought you could come up with something better but apparently you’re still a weenie. You have had your brain fixed by the crooks and you think wonderland is shouting ” let’s fix Malaysia ‘. A slogan, and a cheap one, not that different from the Bugis coward’s unity bandana or the DAP’s Malaysian First. Come on now.

        Reply
        • 18. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 11:42 am

          “I thought you could come up with something better but apparently you’re still a weenie.”

          Name calling and labeling. Clearly you must be severely butthurt to bring up my name in your post..

          I honestly can’t be bothered explaining myself to people like you so the initial response is sufficient. Whatever the sheeple on here may say about DAP and the oppo, they ultimately are not the ones who have destroyed the country’s economy, UMNO should bear that responsibility. But continue being stupid enough to vote them in. I’m well on my way of getting out of here and frankly I can’t wait.

          Reply
          • 19. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:40 pm

            Then why are you still here responding to my comment ? You’re here because you can’t get out ? If you have a PR you would have long bolted but you didn’t. Now you’re saying you’re on your way getting out of this country. If that is the case you should be doing your preparation instead of coming here like a regular talking all sorts of hyperbole. It is apparent that you’re not on some PR as you alleged but you’re here because you need to make a living an an oppo hatchet man. Now where did I say I voted for the BN regime ? You said it, not me. As for name calling, who can top you ? Name calling is your playbook. Please lah, come up with something better. Your tired story of ‘migrating, can’t wait for it’ is not working anymore. I can tell you why I m here. I can also tell you why my friends, colleagues were/are here. We’re here because we love taking potshots at people like you, people like that Bugis and the old man, the oppo that thinks they can do no wrong. We Chinese have a word to describe people like you. You know the word 恥 ? Do you know how to read the word ? People like you belong to the 无恥 category.

            Reply
            • 20. Where's The Justice  |  January 9, 2016 at 1:24 pm

              Whoa, long response. Clearly butthurt from all the prison style manshaming.

              “You’re here because you can’t get out ? If you have a PR you would have long bolted but you didn’t.”

              We have a live one here. Clearly not the sharpest tool in the shed.

              “We Chinese have a word to describe people like you. You know the word 恥 ? Do you know how to read the word ? People like you belong to the 无恥 category.”

              According to your warped logic, you are only Chinese if you come from a certain socio economic background. So is that quote only from the 5% crowd?

              Reply
              • 21. Islam1st  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:25 am

                Haiya if you can’t yourself useful for the country, or yhe country useful to you, then why bother staying? Berambus lah. Then again how stupid can you be not able to make yourself relevant in a country you lives in?? Must be really2 stupid aren’t you?

                Reply
                • 22. Where's The Justice  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:16 am

                  Eat a D bro, eat a D.

                  Reply
    • 23. Harlequin  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:47 pm

      Spectre

      Since you and your friends/colleagues most probably hail from the upper echelon, there is little doubt you do see the frivolity and undue advantages afforded by the government of the day more clearly than those trying to make do from the bottom of the food chain.

      Sure, there are probably just as many disadvantaged Malays as the Chinese and the Indians. But, unlike the Malays, other races have the liberty to voice their grouses without the baggage of religion and bangsa. So they have less qualms going for the opposition to UBaH.

      I do think UBAH is the inevitable route for the non-Malays. If it ain’t broke don’t fix but it is now truly broken, their once dominance in economy which the Chinese translate to a kind of psychological safety net is no longer there.

      The minority Chinese can no longer claim economic superiority, with the continued racial card still in play by UMNO on the ‘rich Chinese taking from the poor Malays’ narrative on one side and the Islamists from PAS using their religion card on the other, there is little alternative for the Chinese.

      You talked about education, I don’t totally disagree. But is it enough?

      10 or 20 years ago, a college degree meant something. Today, a meagre college paper is the minimum. Everyone has a college degree. Parents tell their children study hard, get a degree if you don’t want to stand behind the counter flipping burgers. The blue collar label is much shunned. There is little wonder why graduates had a hard time coming in terms why they end up unemployed or doing jobs their parents tell them they don’t have to do if they studied hard, and ironically they did.

      http://www.bbc.com/news/business-28062071

      Reply
      • 24. Harlequin  |  January 9, 2016 at 12:52 pm

        Edit to add:

        Since you and your friends/colleagues most probably hail from the upper echelon, there is little doubt you do see the frivolity and undue advantages afforded by the government of the day more clearly than those trying to make do from the bottom of the food chain. For the higher you stand, the further you see.

        Reply
        • 25. RINA  |  January 9, 2016 at 4:47 pm

          Harlequin,

          ..There is little wonder why graduates had a hard time coming in terms why they end up unemployed….

          Taktau you belajar dan dapat qualification dari mana (tak laku) that you find it difficult to secure employment? Be more motivated bole tak?

          Kalau payah getting a job in Malaysia, cari luaq Negara. Aisehman apa susah sangat kamu ni? Even in Singapore banyak senang to earn >RM12K for a new Malaysain degree graduates. Apa susah, weekends just fly home (murah lagi cepat) to be with yr family. Naik bas pun sekadar SGD30 only.

          Australia you jadi lorry driver saja pun easy dpt AUD1.8K weekly. Part-time basuh kereta can get extra income. Usaha la sikit. Yang dok kompen tak henti apasal?

          Fix your attitude dulu.

          Reply
          • 26. Harlequin  |  January 9, 2016 at 6:17 pm

            Dear Rina

            I recall your disdain for folks (Chinese mostly) who travel to and fro the causeway to make a decent living down south. I see your perception has changed since. Reality does have that effect, eh?

            True, the idealistic young grads need to get a grip of themselves in face of reality, the government on the other hand has to fulfil their obligation to the people by coming up with policies and practices that enable Malaysia to compete globally with its SEA neighbours. At the moment I don’t see any concerted effort by the government to live up to its obligation to make Malaysia competitive, without which, job creation here is going to be stagnant.

            Quote: Taktau you belajar dan dapat qualification dari mana (tak laku)…

            Perhaps you care to enlighten which are the ones tak laku?…. Those institutions that don’t make it into the top 500 World rankings?

            Reply
            • 27. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 7:08 pm

              The tak laku……or to be precise, grads with degrees but practically clueless when it comes to applying what they have learned to solve real world problems. I doubt university rankings tell the whole story. You have technical universities in countries like Germany and Austria churning out competent technical grads who have no problems finding employment and looking at the global 500 rankings you do find them but they are not that high in order of ranking.

              Our problem, the one problem I want to point out, is the lack of industry participation in designing courses that fit the needs of industry. Industry somehow think this is the function of tertiary institutions and industry is there to absorb these ‘products’ of higher education. So when the ‘products’ are not up to mark, the customers reject them outright. So the ‘products’ or rather grads are left to their own devices. One solution I have in mind is to decentralize tertiary education but in the context of this country, this is not something which the powers that be would endorse. Even with a change of governing party, I doubt the new rulers will endorse such a proposal. After all, keeping the people at a disadvantage is how you stay in power, how power is perpetuated. Or perhaps you have another way of looking at the tak laku issue.

              Reply
              • 28. Harlequin  |  January 9, 2016 at 8:40 pm

                Spectre

                Quote:Or perhaps you have another way of looking at the tak laku issue…

                To be dead honest, I wasn’t going as deep as you.

                I just find it a tad ironical Rina making the point about ‘initiative’ when most of the unemployed grads from a so-called ‘revered’ local university (ranked below World 500) are absorbed by the governmental sector. So much for initiative.

                As to what I think of the tak laku issue, commentator IAW made a comment on another thread which I meant to reply, but I’ll just do it here because it sums up my point.

                Quote IAW : “The Melayu, especially the non-elite, on the other hand will accept any offer even if they do not like the course offered…”

                This is the precise difference between the Malay grads and the Chinese grads.

                The Malays think getting the paper certification is an end in itself. Tamat matlamat.

                Sure, it’ll make a nice addition to your wall decor with the cert all framed up but others know it’s not about the degree, cert, accolades etc, because at the end of the day, you cannot eat nor feed your family with that piece of paper.

                What you learned has to be relevant and in tandem with the employment trend. Because there is where the moola is.

                Sure, there are those born into privileged who stand on high ground and declare the pursuit of academics purely for knowledge, for the rest of the population, the paper is the means to better pay and better life.

                So being shoved some irrelevant courses that eventually limit your employment chances are not OK, spoken strictly from a practical standpoint.

                Quote: So when the ‘products’ are not up to mark, the customers reject them outright.

                I agree. Maths for example is a problem for a certain community. Instead of addressing this phenomena, the authorities instead chose the easy way out. Let’s say the passing grade for add maths are not universally standard for ‘all schools.’ If the QC is not there, quite rightly the eventual product will be rejected.

                Reply
                • 29. I Am Woman  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:34 am

                  Youmistake my comment for absolute paper chase. No, the Malays do not think that paper certification is the matlamat, but it’s a means to an end. Let’s say you can’t get into medicine instead you are offered biology. The Melayu will take it because after getting that piece of paper for biology they can apply for med school. It’s a longer process but they are willing. (Personallyknow 2 such cases).

                  For some others, when you come from nothing, scrapping for food daily that piece of paper can bring you a better job and a better future for your next generation.

                  Reply
                  • 30. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:53 am

                    IAW

                    My apologies if I misread your meaning.

                    Still, you do recognize Malay students are more complacent with whatever alternative courses offered by the Govt as opposed to the Chinese who would try their luck down South.

                    We will omit the privileged ones who can afford to pay and pick from this discussion altogether.

                    Cheers

                    Reply
                    • 31. I Am Woman  |  January 10, 2016 at 2:38 pm

                      Complacent carries such a negative connotation especially when applied to malays.

                      No it’s not about being complacent. Going South requires money so it is not really that easy.

                      I’ve councelled quite a few SPM leavers on their next course of action. In my area we are looking at youths who come from lower to low-middle income group. Smart, some brilliant and yet still unable to get scholarships or get into universities or courses that they want. Going to a public university is a hardship for the family and yet almost all of them will beg, borrow and triple their workload to further their studies.

                      So yes, education is not as privileged privileged for the malays as everyone assumes.

                    • 32. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 9:14 pm

                      IAW

                      Quote: “So yes, education is not as privileged privileged for the malays as everyone assumes.”

                      Are you saying the Malays are unaffected by their race privileges?

                      Why are you quick to downplay the privileges Malay held over other races?

                      I am mindful of the fact hard work and sacrifices are prevalent among the young regardless of race, what more for those who are not well off.

                      Your vehement insistence that the Malays enjoy NO such ‘accorded’ advantage over the non-Malay reeks of pure denial. More pronounced than ever with the existence of ‘Malays-only’ Universities like UITM around.

                      I believe commentator HY was making the same point to you on another thread.

                  • 33. Spectre  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:54 am

                    Even that piece of paper is no longer adequate. Now the goal is, well at least for the better informed anyway, is to get into a top 500 university. For someone who can get into a top 500 school, it’s not just the ‘paper’. It’s the connections to the rich and powerful. I m sorry to tell people that if you get into the ‘wrong’ university, you can forget about the ‘connections’ thing. Which is why so many grads struggle, a piece of paper without the necessary connections takes you nowhere.

                    Reply
                • 34. Islam1st  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:47 am

                  Masih dgn teori Melayu bodoh to justify kiasuness? Well done! It will take you ‘far’…

                  Reply
                  • 35. Spectre  |  January 10, 2016 at 2:33 pm

                    My friend ‘What Is This’ crossed swords with WTJ many times. He said to me that WTJ is a banana, always talking about migrating to Australia but look, WTJ is still here. He’s a hatchet man lah. Hatchet man mana ada modal nak pergi menetap kat Australia ? Awak ingat mat salleh Australia terima orang macam WTJ ? Bila tiba PRU14 WTJ masih tetap berada kat sini, kat blog ni, masih lagi cakap isu yang sama, konon dah hijrah.

                    Reply
                    • 37. Spectre  |  January 10, 2016 at 3:11 pm

                      Hmm……..Helen,

                      that Anon is too serious sounding. Not part of our circle. Our members are too condescending, unlike that Anon, so he’s not one of us. But one of us, who goes by the nick Survivor, he could sound like a serious person if he wants to but he’s in Singapore running his new venture so he’s unlikely to show up anytime soon. I was hoping for What Is This to show up but he can be too condescending judging by his comments. PPP is a Malay and as far as he is concerned, he’s done at least for now. He has his own ventures to run, ocassionally we would meet up in Suria KLCC for afternoon tea, now the man is in JB. AI, you remember him ? He’s somewhere in north Malaysia.

                    • 38. Helen Ang  |  January 10, 2016 at 3:24 pm

                      re: “PPP is a Malay and as far as he is concerned, he’s done at least for now.”

                      LOL. Long time no hear that moniker.

                      re: “AI, you remember him?”

                      Yup.

                      You guys (The Syndicate) have been watching over me in this blog since Day One, huh? My sincere thanks to all.

                      The DAP gang(sters) are also lurking around here too but since I’m democratic, their comments are still being allowed to see the light of day.

                    • 39. HY  |  January 10, 2016 at 3:38 pm

                      I think “anon” used to comment in demi negara, he is much sophisticated and rational than this group of so call “connected”, opinionated n self aggrandizing kids.

                    • 40. Spectre  |  January 10, 2016 at 4:11 pm

                      One can never expect those beneath the higher strata of society to understand real issues. After all, weren’t most of them commodities traded by the white men the British over 2 centuries ago ? Or in other words indentured labor instituted by the British in the 18th century. Whereas a minority of these people have freed themselves from this indentured servitude, it is also true that a vast majority of such people, their descendants in the present context, still under the sway of such a system, only this time the servitude extends into the psychological realm. It is no surprise that these people are ever so willing to offer their services to their ex colonial masters, the masters of their forefathers, in the hope that somehow their livelihood will change for the better. Speaking of which, there are countless of them lurking on this blog, not to mention also a number of uncouth vermin of a certain color(s).

                    • 41. HY  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:48 pm

                      the coolie from both china n india, though was ill treated by the white man, made great contribution in building railroad, track, infra, mining, agriculture etc, their devotion n merit is in total contrast with one that flee china after the lugou bridge incident, who dare not face the invader n at the same time contribute nothing to his adopted country, this coward if given a choice, would run away to fiji shd he found out the sinking of prince of wales n repulse. however at that time, I guess most probably he was hiding in the jungle trying to foster the connection with the communist, or could be the japanese as well, who know what coward think n do?

                      now the coward cucu has made some money with the usual flee n connect trick inherited from the coward, the cucu start to show off his snobbish character as if we dun know his dad or granddad is nothing but a coward wakaka.

                      go back to the group and see if they got better insult, the coolie attempt so far is boring n feeble, n i am done unless the flee n connect group have something fresh, ok?

                    • 42. Spectre  |  January 11, 2016 at 9:04 am

                      I say, the coolie made contribution ? What hogwash. They built the railroads etc because the mat salleh made them do it otherwise no food, no shelter, beat them up. Buat kerja itu pun sebab mat salleh paksa mereka. Nak tipu siapa ? Yet after almost 2 centuries still cannot admit they are coolies, their cucu cannot admit they are the keturunan hamba because the forefathers too ashamed to admit their bloodline. The people who came before and after the Marco Polo bridge incident have made their contributions by investing in China when Deng started reform and opening up. The keturunan hamba where ? Cakap saja tapi takde buat apa apa pun. Buat hal pandai lah. Konon kata diri mereka Cina tapi tak buat apa apa untuk masyarakat Cina.

            • 43. RINA  |  January 9, 2016 at 8:04 pm

              Harlequin

              ….institutions that don’t make it into the top 500 World rankings…

              …government on the other hand has to fulfil their obligation to the people by coming up with policies and practices that enable Malaysia to compete globally with its SEA …

              Haiyaa.

              Justin Beiber and Psy came from any of the top 500 ranking institiutions? Macam mana they compete? Tunggu gomen depa come up with policies and practices juga ke?

              Rasanya kamu ni si pemalas, otak ada tapi tak tau pakai. Tang produce and jual barangan fake, ciplak and tiruan memang first class. Thats why I ask you to fix your attitude first.

              Reply
              • 44. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:18 am

                Rina

                I sure hope we can all be Justin, PSY and Rain. But still, someone gotta earn moola to buy tickets to contribute towards their bread and butter. Even superstars gotta eat, right?

                Are we too demanding on the YBs, Tuns and Datos? I thought they were well renumerated with the sole purpose of running this country and ensure the welfare of its people are taken care of?

                If that is too taxing for them I am sure there are others who will gladly take the burden off their shoulders. Hahaha

                Reply
                • 45. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:22 am

                  Edit to correct:

                  Should read…

                  …. well renumerated for the sole purpose….

                  Reply
                  • 46. Helen Ang  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:40 am

                    While you’re at it, you might as well correct your spelling too – it should be “remunerated”.

                    Common mistake.

                    Reply
                    • 47. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:40 am

                      Noted

                    • 48. Islam1st  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:49 am

                      Ouch!

                    • 49. Helen Ang  |  January 10, 2016 at 12:30 pm

                      No lah, it’s a common error. I’ve made the same mistake too myself.

                    • 50. Harlequin  |  January 10, 2016 at 2:03 pm

                      1st

                      Ssshhh not so loud.

                      I kena but you are the who rasa…

                      People might get the wrong idea….

                    • 51. islam1st  |  January 10, 2016 at 11:28 pm

                      Tak la, bukan apa, korang kan grammar police. English kan par excellence, no?

        • 52. Spectre  |  January 9, 2016 at 4:55 pm

          Speaking of economic superiority of the ethnic Chinese, this is a blatant lie :) The Chinese never had an economic superiority over the Malays or the Indians for that matter. To say it bluntly, a minority within an ethnic minority held and continue to hold a significant proportion of this country’s wealth. Of course this minority identify themselves as Chinese but their definition of Chinese, I m not going to further clarify since you should be aware by now how the Chinese identity is framed by this minority.

          Only those who are in complete denial of what is really happening harped on economic superiority. I m not going to touch on the Malays here since the image of Chinese economic superiority is so ingrained in their mind that any mention of the Chinese losing their grip economically will invite ludricous commentary from this said crowd.

          The Chinese are complaining bitterly, this I can understand, but they have got it all wrong. Why they complain of something they never had in the first place is because they have been conditioned to believe that they possessed the said ‘superiority; by the vested interests that have undermined the community’s interests for almost 60 years and counting. Who are the parties that comprise of these vested interests ? Their so called champions who told them, and still continue to tell them that they have to do this, to become like this so that they can remain as Chinese while the said vested interests do the total opposite of what they are telling the Chinese, whether in education or economics. Ironically, in a sarcastic manner, I along with those from my social economic circle benefited and continue to benefit from the sort of false narratives projected by the vested interests on the Chinese community. While there are those from my circle who pointed out the errors in believing these false narratives to the Chinese community, they were ignored. In a warped sense, this benefits me and those of my circles.

          While I do not disagree with you on the education front, I must point out that education is still man’s best hope when speaking of social mobility. Parents telling their children to study hard, get a college degree, find a good job. I can understand that. But on this score too, they have got it all wrong. Totally wrong. They have the wrong context. They have a limited context. If only they are willing to expand their context, surely they would have known that this advice they are giving their children is not going to be helpful. But in the daily tussle for survival, making money, showering their children with all sorts of ‘luxuries’ because they have less time for parenting, well, that’s a disaster waiting to happen, or rather, it is happening right now. Graduates finding it hard to find decent paying jobs, they should start asking themselves if they possess the wrong context instead of complaining bitterly of their predicament.

          The first paragraph of your commentary sums up perfectly what/how people like me and my social circle perceive/look at the world but try telling this to the people. You actually think people have the capacity to understand what you have pointed in the first paragraph of your commentary ?

          Reply
  • 53. I Am Woman  |  January 10, 2016 at 10:43 pm

    “Your vehement insistence that the Malays enjoy NO such ‘accorded’ advantage over the non-Malay reeks of pure denial. More pronounced than ever with the existence of ‘Malays-only’ Universities like UITM around.”

    There is only UITM, the group, as a Bumiputera only university, just as you have the Chinese majority university like UTAR.

    Look, there is a policy, we know that. But the reality is there are more students than places in public universities, and with the meritocracy system in place since 2003 places are more competitive.

    When the opposition harped on education privilege, and I look around and I see the Malay kids struggling just to get into ANY university, it strikes me that it is not fair to these kids. You can’t deny that every time they bring up this issue, they always make it seem that these Malay kids who got the scholarships or got into a good course are there because they are Malays and not because of their hard work and achievement. That’s the frustrating part.

    Reply

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