A bloody Valentine for dead teenagers

February 16, 2016 at 8:18 am 43 comments

An Israeli border police violently tipped over the wheelchair of a Palestinian man and sent disabled 53-year-old Majid al-Fahouri sprawling backwards.

Footage of the incident in West Bank – where the sectarian conflict is again intensifying – went viral in the social media yesterday.

Video clip here.

BELOW: Vicious act of bullying the vulnerable

neo Zionist wheelchair

Majid had been trying to reach Yasmin Rashad al-Zarou who lay on the ground bleeding. His intention was to give first aid to Yasmin.

The Palestinian girl had been shot by Israeli security forces for attempting “to commit a stabbing attack”, allegedly, at a checkpoint/roadblock.

There are conflicting accounts as to Yasmin’s age. The Israeli version puts Yasmin’s age as 21 while Palestinian sources say she is either 13 or 14. The Palestinians also refuted the story by Israeli authorities that the teenager had tried to stab anyone.

BELOW: The injured girl can be seen on the road in the background

Facebook / Raed Abu Rumaila

Facebook / Raed Abu Rumaila

Two peoples who cannot co-exist

Newsweek reported, “Israeli forces shot and killed five Palestinians, three of them teenagers, in Jerusalem and the West Bank on Sunday [Feb 14], saying that they had all launched attempted attacks against authorities”.

Two of the boys were shot dead by Israeli soldiers for throwing rocks at passing cars near the town of Jenin in West Bank. Both the Palestinian teens were said to have been 15 years old, according to the BBC.

A day earlier on Feb 13, Israeli soldiers in Hebron shot dead Palestinian girl Kilzar Mohd Abdulhaleem al-Owiwi near a mosque. The 17-year-old deceased was accused by the Israeli army as an “assailant” attempting to stab a soldier, said an Al-Jazeera report.

MAP: The Zionists kept grabbing and grabbing land until Palestinians are now left with only two non-contiguous strips that are Gaza and West Bank

Shrinking Palestine

Confrontation escalating into a civil war 

Writing in the New York Times on Feb 10, three-time Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas Friedman opined,

“The peace process is dead. It’s over, folks, so please stop sending the New York Times Op-Ed page editor your proposals for a two-state solution between Israelis and Palestinians. The next U.S. president will have to deal with an Israel determined to permanently occupy all the territory between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, including where 2.5 million West Bank Palestinians live.”

Friedman, who had previously been his newspaper’s correspondent in the Middle East war zones, believes that the two-state solution was killed equally by both sides complicit to the fighting – the ultra orthodox Jewish settlers, right-wing Jewish billionaire funders, Netanyahu, Mahmoud Abbas and Hamas, among others.

He anticipates that a one-state era will soon begin — following “a steady low-grade civil war between Palestinians and Israelis”.

VIDEO: Showing Yasmin al-Zarou who was shot by Israeli border police in Hebron on Valentine’s Day

Yasmin shot Hebron

Reality check: Too late for peace

Israel’s military engineers are currently searching for Hamas “terror tunnels” along the Gaza border.

Meanwhile in its breaking news, AFP reports that 28 Palestinians were shot by Israeli troops early Monday morning in the West Bank city of Ramallah.

The injured Palestinians had been involved in clashes with the Israeli soldiers who raided their Al-Amari refugee camp. Hundreds of Palestinian rioters threw stones and glass bottles/petrol bombs. The youths were met with a ‘return fire’ of rubber bullets and live ammunition by the Israeli raiding squad.

Some quarters in Israel have been paying lip service to a two-state solution but the reality is that these two peoples cannot live together peacefully in the same land even as neighbours, much less in the same house.

wall-prayer

Palestinian men pray at the separation wall built by the Zionist regime

Pack up and go, start life afresh somewhere else

Middle East expert Alan Hart suggests that as things are and look like going, the Palestinians have merely two options left.

(Hart is ITN’s former Middle East chief correspondent as well as ex-BBC man who presented the channel’s Panorama programme specializing in the Middle East.)

One option, he says, is to dissolve the Palestinian Authority and hand back full responsibility for the occupation to Israel.

The second option is to “accept crumbs from Zionism’s table in the shape of Bantustans on 30-40 percent of the West Bank which they could call a state if they wished, or pack their bags and leave to start new lives elsewhere”.

Entry filed under: neo Zionists. Tags: .

Annie is a liar and fraud just like the Dapsters Chinese century: Lean, mean, power-hungry machine

43 Comments Add your own

  • 1. I Am Woman  |  February 16, 2016 at 9:51 am

    Sadly, even in our country people “pack up and go”.

    http://ongkianming.com/2016/02/05/article-7828-individuals-who-wont-be-spending-chinese-new-year-this-year-as-malaysians/

    I guess they no longer want to spend their days living within a walled area.

    Reply
    • 2. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 10:00 am

      Ethnic minority elites in the Philippines also live within exclusive gated communities.

      “My relatives live literally walled off from the Filipino masses, in a luxurious, all-Chinese residential enclave, on streets named Harvard and Princeton. The entry points are manned by armed guards.” – Amy Chua, famous Chinese American author

      http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/features/amy-chua-philippines-chinese-minority-free-market-democracy-ethnic-hatred

      Reply
      • 3. C72  |  February 16, 2016 at 11:21 am

        I believe the 11th Malaysia Plan is on the right track to elevate the B40 and M40 households. Without such a strategy and road map, we can & will descend into a highly polarised society by socio-economic class and race. That will be a disaster.

        All the ANC and the Opposition know is how to attack and complain; creating a toxic negative mindset among the majority. If taken to the extreme, then everyone loses.

        I think this must be typical human nature – be it countries or organisations – we spend so much energy fighting amongst ourselves while there are bigger threats or competitors out there.

        Btw Gong Hei Fatt Choy ah Helen

        Reply
        • 4. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 1:09 pm

          Keong Hee Huat Chai 2u2.

          Reply
        • 5. Lousy.Engineer  |  February 16, 2016 at 10:33 pm

          “All the ANC and the Opposition know is how to attack and complain”

          Especially the cainis. They need to STFU now (jgn bising byk2), be grateful , have more $3X and produce more babies instead of moaning online. Imagine that the cainis only have, what, a pathetic 1.4 babies per couple at the moment??? By 2030, BN can say GFY to the cainis electorate. Here’s a podcast about cainis dilemma for entertainment sake featuring one of Helen’s favorite DAP MPs.

          Reply
          • 6. norman fernandez  |  February 17, 2016 at 12:47 am

            Maybe the Chinese population in 2030 will drop even further. But, the Chinese will be a lean, mean, highly educated and progressive community. Just like the Jews, the are nimble and able to survive in which ever condition and whatever political terrain.

            What more the next economic superpower is China. China has the clout and no world power can stop it’s economic tentacle. Today, Malaysia which is on a fire-sale is being snapped up by China and come 2030, China may be able to buy up the whole of Malaysia with still change to spare.

            Malays on the other hand will be hardpressed to compete whatmore Malays will not have the skills and education required to compete. There will be newer Malays with thousands of Bangladeshis intermarrying Malays and diluting the real Malay. The real Malay will need to share the already small pie with the new Malays. Oil the mainstay to help propel Malay economy will run out or technological advances will be such oil maybe something of a relic. Also, the DNA of the Bangladeshis or the future Malays is such that they will overwhelm the original Malays. Add to that Malays will be torn into sectarians and split into Shiah, Sunnis, Wahhabis, Salafist and other sects.

            So, do not ever think being a majority is always advantage, not in a Chinese century. It is the minority Chinese who are all ready to embrace the Chinese century.

            So, I think the gloating will only come to bite the Malays.

            Reply
            • 7. Akim  |  February 17, 2016 at 11:06 am

              India is also coming up. Modi has just said the world is slowing down but India is going up in growth rate. Wouldn’t you like India to be “buying up” Malaysia as well?

              Malays not have the skills and education required to compete? You know the number of Malay Master’s degree and PhD holders now?

              intermarrying Malays and diluting the real Malay? Are you a real .. what are you .. your name suggests you are Portuguese? Or Sri Lankanese?

              the Bangladeshis or the future Malays is such that they will overwhelm the original Malays? Have you been overwhelmed to be saying that?

              Malays will be torn into sectarians and split into Shiah, Sunnis, Wahhabis, Salafist and other sects? You are just being nasty, aren’t you? Wd you like to say what sect you belong to?

              Reply
    • 8. Spectre  |  February 16, 2016 at 11:16 am

      Well, if you have ‘money’, the right course of action is to carefully transfer your money to a foreign jurisdiction(s) because in a sea of rising inequality, you are fair game in case there is regime change. I personally know of friends who sent their children to Australia and the UK, buying property and putting some money in those places so that in case there is chaos over here, with the touch of a button, their money will arrive in those places and then they can make their exits by going to the nearest exit points i.e airports. Wealthy, smart people have a plan, only those who are in denial think there is still hope in this country. This is realism.

      Reply
      • 9. Akim  |  February 16, 2016 at 4:10 pm

        Yeah, during the Vietnam War and the ascendancy of the Domino Theory (Vietnam falls, Cambodia, Thailand fall, Malaysia will also fall to the commies), quite a number of such blokes left Malaysia.

        When the going got tough, the tough got going, they said. Utter nonsense. Those were the non-loyal Malaysians who were here only for what they could get, had never heard the Kennedy saying, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

        But that kind of people better leave, anyway. You’ll never know whether they’d be quietly supporting the enemy for whatever they could get, if a war occurs to morrow.

        Reply
      • 10. Akim  |  February 16, 2016 at 4:30 pm

        “in a sea of rising inequality, the guy said, presumably referring to Malaysia.

        Of course, like the DAP blokes often making “wild, unsubstantiated and unjustified claims and accusations”, he wouldn’t state what kind of inequalities. Or if he acknowledges what has been referred to as “the quid pro quo situation” whereby the Malays, having agreed to citizenship right for the non-Malays, had their Special Position placed by the British colonialists in the draft and subsequently enshrined in the Constitution of the country that was approved by the Parliament. That Special Position that was extended to the Bumiputeras of Sabah and Sarawak upon the formation of Malaysia.

        This kind of fellows would not contribute an iota of good for nation building and the creation of long-term peace and harmony in this country. Like the DAP, he would not explain or justify his claim or accusation, casually and irresponsibly casting aspersion and creating ill feelings. It’d be good if he leaves to morrow.

        Reply
  • 11. An Ordinary Malaysian  |  February 16, 2016 at 10:29 am

    Helen,

    Personally, I could not care less whether Israelis killed Palestinians or Palestinians killed Israelis.

    Their quarrel has nothing to do with Malaysia – never did.

    It is unfortunate that some Malaysians have taken it upon themselves to import the Israeli-Palestinian problem into Malaysia.

    We don’t seem to care very much about Beijing persecuting Falun Gong (well, I don’t), or that Turkey has been killing Kurds over the last few days (I don’t), or that the Prime Minister of Cambodia is as corrupt as any politician you may choose to name (I don’t), or that US$200billion of corrupt Nigerian money have been traced to just in Dubai alone (I don’t).

    Instead, we make such a song and dance about those poor Palestinians being oppressed by the Israelis or those poor Israelis being persecuted by those horrible Palestinians (depending on whose POV you are supporting).

    How about worrying about our Malaysian education system, our Malaysian health system, our Malaysian infrastructure, our Malaysian standard of living, etc etc for a change? You know, simple basic issues which affect every single Malaysian.

    Let those Israelis keep killing Palestinians and the Palestinians kill Israelis – they know it is wrong and they know what they have to do to stop what they are doing.

    IT IS THEIR PROBLEM AND NONE OF MY BUSINESS.

    My problem is to make Malaysia a better place for all Malaysians, regardless of race or religion or political persuasion or sexual preference or gender or social status or almost anything you may care to add.

    Is that a bad thing on my part?

    Strangely, my problem is of no interest to some Malaysians.

    I have no doubt that my problem will be ridiculed by commentators here in your blog :)

    Reply
    • 12. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 1:16 pm

      re: “IT IS THEIR PROBLEM AND NONE OF MY BUSINESS.”

      Jerusalem – that the Israelis and Palestinians are fighting over – is the holy city. That’s why it matters.

      Reply
      • 13. Cina  |  February 16, 2016 at 2:06 pm

        So what? Matters to who, the fucking Melayu?

        Reply
        • 14. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 2:37 pm

          Methinks the moniker ‘Cina DAP’ is more suitable for you.

          Reply
          • 15. Cina  |  February 17, 2016 at 11:07 am

            Sorry to disappoint you. I am a Buddhist. You cunt.

            Reply
            • 16. Helen Ang  |  February 17, 2016 at 4:45 pm

              What a shame you are to Buddhism. You’re not practising mindfulness of speech.

              Reply
              • 17. Spectre  |  February 17, 2016 at 5:46 pm

                A person says he/she is a X and you believe him/her ? Remember, since he/she is RBA, you should never take his/her word seriously. How do you know if someone is RBA ? The language employed.

                Reply
                • 18. Helen Ang  |  February 17, 2016 at 6:01 pm

                  The foul language employed by the commenter calling himself ‘Cina’ reflects Red Beanie.

                  By declaring himself a Buddhist, he accepts that DAP is an evangelical party, and thus through disassociating himself from Christianity, he wants us to disassociate his online persona from DAP. He wants to persuade the general readership that he’s not a Red Beanie.

                  Just like the RBA menyamar sebagai Melayu and disgracing Islam though their online conduct, likewise these DAP operatives disgrace Buddhism too when they do not practise Buddhist tenets.

                  Reply
    • 19. C72  |  February 16, 2016 at 2:30 pm

      Nothing bad about being focused on local issues but doesn’t hurt to have a stance on what is happening globally too.

      Falun Gong – harmless if they are only a meditation and exercise group. Unfortunately, their core teaching if one has happened to read through them, is a hodgepodge mix of Taoism and Buddhism – taking bits and pieces mixed up together; and presenting them out of context. In that respect, it is a worrying movement, dare I say cult even. Fortunately, the Malaysian government consulted with and took the advice of the relevant religious councils here and disallowed the recognition of FG as a religion.

      Reply
    • 20. I Am Woman  |  February 16, 2016 at 3:20 pm

      I for one will not ridicule your opinion. It is a valid sentiment. However, there’s a reason why the Israel-Palestinian conflict is an important issue in America, Europe, Russia and pretty much in any country with ties to those nations. While it is good to concentrate on our local issues, it is naive to ignore the conflict.

      Every conflict that has arisen in the middle east since the formation of Israel can be traced back to that conflict. That conflict is less about religion and more about power and politics.

      Reply
      • 21. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 3:36 pm

        Jerusalem is the City of Prophecy. It resonates deeply with those who believe in the second coming of Christ and Armageddon.

        The crusades were fought throughout the Middle Ages between the two armies of God for possession of this holy land.

        Reply
        • 22. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 3:58 pm

          Postscript:

          Even in our present day, evangelical Christians make pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

          Reply
          • 23. I Am Woman  |  February 16, 2016 at 5:57 pm

            I am not saying religion doesn’t play a part, but that it us less so about religion. Consider, if religion was the root, then how come the Christians, the really minority Jews and the Muslim could live peacefully prior to the establishment of the state of Israel, in the land known as Palestine?

            Reply
            • 24. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 6:29 pm

              re: “then how come the Christians, the really minority Jews and the Muslim could live peacefully prior to the establishment of the state of Israel”

              Quote from http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/modern-world-history-1918-to-1980/the-middle-east-1917-to-1973/palestine-1918-to-1948/

              “… after 1920, many Jews migrated to the area and lived with the far more numerous Arabs there. At this time, the area was ruled by the British and both Arabs and Jews appeared to live together in some form of harmony in the sense that both tolerated the existence of the other.

              […] In August 1929, relations between the Jews and Arabs in Palestine broke down. The focal point of this discontent was Jerusalem.

              The primary cause of trouble was the increased influx of Jews who had emigrated to Palestine. The number of Jews in the region had doubled in ten years

              The city of Jerusalem also had major religious significance for both Arabs and Jews and over 200 deaths occurred in just four days in August (23rd to the 26th).

              Arab nationalism was whipped up by the Mufti of Jerusalem, Haji Amin al-Husseini. He claimed that the number of Jews threatened the very lifestyle of the Arabs in Palestine.

              The violence that occurred in August 1929 did not deter Jews from going to Palestine. In 1931, 4,075 Jews emigrated to the region. In 1935, it was 61,854. The Mufti estimated that by the 1940’s there would be more Jews in Palestine than Arabs and that their power in the area would be extinguished on a simple numerical basis.

              In May 1936, more violence occurred and the British had to restore law and order using the military. Thirty four soldiers were killed in the process. The violence did not stop. In fact, it became worse after November 1937.

              For the Arabs there were two enemies – the Jews and the British authorities based in Palestine via their League mandate.

              For the Jews there were also two enemies – the Arabs and the British.

              Therefore, the British were pushed into the middle of a conflict they had seemingly little control over as the two other sides involved were so driven by their own beliefs. […]

              An uneasy truce occurred during the war [WW2] when hostilities seemed to cease. This truce, however, was only temporary.” Quote ends

              BELOW: Hitler hosting the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini in Berlin 1941. http://time.com/4084301/hitler-grand-mufi-1941/

              Reply
              • 25. Helen Ang  |  February 16, 2016 at 6:47 pm

                ADD:

                In the period between the World Wars I and II, Palestine (Transjordan) was under the British mandate or rule. The region was also under the French sphere of influence.

                Once the Jews got the power to rule through the creation of the state of Israel under the auspices of the UN, then the Yahudi kenakan the Palestinians lah who felt compelled to leave under pressure of war – Israel’s ‘war of independence’.

                Like Singapore that imports Chinese from Malaysia, Indonesia, Hong Kong and China, Israel started importing Jews en masse from any/everywhere so that the Jewish race would become a strong majority (similar to the Chinese augmentation in Singapore).

                Some Palestinians simply fled in 1948. They probably thought they were going to be massacred or ethnic cleansed. Or they thought they could return and reclaim their olive groves after the war ended. They were mistaken.

                Some Palestinians in exile still want a ‘Right of Return’ which is wishful thinking as this is one condition that Israel will never agree to. They will remain scattered as a diaspora.

                Queen Rania of Jordan is of Palestinian descent.

                Reply
        • 26. Chris  |  February 16, 2016 at 4:48 pm

          “Friedman, who had previously been his newspaper’s correspondent in the Middle East war zones, believes that the two-state solution was killed equally by both sides complicit to the fighting – the ultra orthodox Jewish settlers, right-wing Jewish billionaire funders, Netanyahu, Mahmoud Abbas and Hamas, among others.”

          Not every Israeli Jew is a Zionist ideologue … Christian Zionists please take note.

          http://rhr.org.il/eng/judaism-and-human-rights/

          “The Torah demands of us “Justice, justice, shall you pursue” (Deut 16:20). As Rabbis for Human Rights (RHR), we are committed to the principles of justice for all God’s creatures. RHR is the only organization in Israel today that speaks about human rights in the voice of the Jewish tradition. We derive our authority from two main sources: humanistic Jewish tradition and from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In a time in which a nationalist and isolationist understanding of Jewish tradition is heard frequently and loudly, Rabbis for Human Rights give expression to the traditional Jewish responsibility for the safety and welfare of the stranger, the different and the weak, the convert, the widow and the orphan.”

          Reply
          • 27. Abdullah  |  February 16, 2016 at 8:28 pm

            In the Name of Allah Most Compassionate Most Merciful

            1. By the fig, and the olive,

            2. And by Mount Sinai,

            3. And by this city of sanctuary (Makkah) ,

            4. Verily, We created man in the best of stature (design),

            5. Then We reduced him to the lowest of the low (through his inordinate trangressions)

            6. Save those who believe (in One True Lord) and do righteous deeds, then they shall have a reward without end (in Paradise).

            7. Then what (or who) could cause you to deny the Recompense (on the Day of Resurrection)?

            8. Is not Allah the Best of judges?

            Reply
          • 28. Lousy.Engineer  |  February 16, 2016 at 10:47 pm

            Thomas Friedman has a German-Jewish heritage. Take note of their last name- Friedman, Goldman (Marcus Goldman- the founder of Goldman Sachs, the investment bank that did biz with our gomen), Goldberg, Goldstein, etc. Milton Friedman, the famous economist.

            Reply
          • 29. Abdullah  |  February 17, 2016 at 8:38 am

            Sayyidina Rasulallah said: “The Jews split into 71 groups; one group will enter Paradise and seventy will enter Hell. The Christians split into 72 groups; one group will enter Paradise and seventy-one will enter Hell. By Him in Whose Power is the life of Muhammad , without doubt, my Ummah will be divided into 73 groups. Only one will enter Paradise and seventy-two will enter Hell.”

            – Ibnu Majah: Kitab al-Fitan, Hafiz Ibn Kathir: Signs before Day of Judgement

            Reply
    • 30. norman fernandez  |  February 17, 2016 at 12:54 am

      I have to agree. Let us think of ourselves. The Israeli- Palestinian conflict will never end. Let them sort it out.

      Reply
  • 31. Akim  |  February 16, 2016 at 4:51 pm

    Those Malaysians saying Israeli-Palestinian issues are none of their business have a right to say so. Just as others can say so many things that affect them as also none of their business. No need to expand that one, just let it be.

    So long as they don’t offend the feelings of the majority of the population of this country who are Muslims or criticize the government stand in pursuit of Article 3 of the Constitution which specifically states “Islam is the religion of the Federation (Malaysia).”

    The Government does not even recognize the self-proclaimed state of Israel, let alone support Israel on any issue. The Government of any country decides on its foreign policies based on the interests of the that country – and, in this case, the interests of the Muslims who from the majority of the population.

    Reply
  • 32. drinho  |  February 16, 2016 at 6:13 pm

    re: they don’t offend the feelings of the majority of the population…..

    What about the recent Federal Court decision on Deepa? Read the link below:-

    http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/muslim-group-accuses-apex-court-of-challenging-allah-in-deepa-ruling

    Reply
    • 33. Spectre  |  February 16, 2016 at 7:18 pm

      Well drinho, this guy has been making the round these past few days and judging by his comments, I would say that he’s the type that subscribes to the it’s either you bow to me or else see what I m going to do to you, not that much different from a certain LGE only diffrence being he’s from the majority ethnic group. I have made my position very clear, those of us who want a better future for ourselves and our family, we must make the necessary preparations, have our exits in place so that when the time comes, we can make our move. As my friend who goes by the moniker What Is This said many times in our conversation, a certain ethnic community is now so enthralled in bombing themselves into oblivion it is better that we be at somewhere else rather than end up being collateral damage. The link you highlighted is just another visible example of a community that has now lost all sense of being rational that sooner or later they will turn on the minorities just because they think someone, some people are hatching a conspiracy here and there to undermine them.

      Reply
      • 34. drinho  |  February 17, 2016 at 1:50 pm

        re: have our exits in place so that when the time comes, we can make our move.

        What you meant by the above? Care to explain?

        Reply
        • 35. Spectre  |  February 17, 2016 at 5:50 pm

          Look at the wealth gap. The Malay masses are mostly at the bottom. How long do you think it’s going to be before you hear someone says “it’s time to seize the wealth of the rich and redistribute it to the masses, Malay masses ?”.

          Reply
          • 36. drinho  |  February 17, 2016 at 7:22 pm

            re: seize the wealth of the rich

            Well, similarly only a small percentage of the non-Malays sits at the top of the wealth pyramid. If the bottom Malays really want to do so, it will only affect the rich non-Malays. Majority of the non-Malays at the low and middle income brackets need not worry.

            Anyway, it will not happen. Just look at the list of richest Malaysians for the past 10 years. Whether they are Malays or non-Malays, their wealth grew tremendously at a pace beyond that of average Malaysians. Due to our political cronyism, rich people will only get richer. No way their wealth will be expropriated and redistributed to the poor masses.

            Reply
    • 37. Akim  |  February 16, 2016 at 9:35 pm

      The Federal Court ruling re Deepa? Isn’t that the highest court of the land and that all parties have had their views heard at the various levels of the court process?

      All of us should respect the Federal Court. All in Malaysia must respect the law.

      As for the guy who wants to leave Malaysia, I’ve said enough already.

      Reply
      • 38. drinho  |  February 17, 2016 at 8:36 am

        Akim,

        Good that you know that is it the highest court of the land and its decision is made based on civil law and not Syariah law.

        Reply
      • 39. Akim  |  February 17, 2016 at 10:48 am

        Good that you know that there is the Syari’ah Court, set up in pursuit of Article 3 of the Constitution which states that “Islam is the religion of the Federation”.

        But we all must accept the decision of the Federal Court. Muslims and non-Muslims. No two way about that.

        Reply
        • 40. drinho  |  February 17, 2016 at 7:13 pm

          re: Syari’ah Court, set up in pursuit of Article 3 of the Constitution which states that “Islam is the religion of the Federation”….

          Are you sure that Article 3 is the clause under which Syariah Court was established?

          Reply
  • 41. onsleuth  |  February 17, 2016 at 7:55 am

    Hwa siew & zhongguo on same sentence. Not exactly entertaining if you are 5% of Malaysian chinese. “What the other malaysian think of us, if they know the meaning of it ” I know you mean well mr. Ambassador , it’s misguided. Donation to chinese type school in Malaysia by foreign China government can be mis-interpreted by other malaysian more than one way. http://m.kinitv.com/video/29411O25

    Reply
  • 42. Akim  |  February 17, 2016 at 11:13 am

    Agree that “Donation to chinese type school in Malaysia by foreign China government can be mis-interpreted by other malaysian more than one way.”

    There should be One School For All. Based on Article 152 on BM. Mandarin and Tamil can be learnt as optional subjects.

    Reply
    • 43. drinho  |  February 17, 2016 at 7:16 pm

      re: Based on Article 152 on BM

      The article does not prohibit learning in vernacular languages. Hence, the continued existence of vernacular schools.

      Reply

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