Christians should stop whining about UiTM’s “anti-Christianization” seminars

April 13, 2016 at 8:29 am 18 comments

Blogger otai ‘A Voice’ wrote @ his blog Another Brick in the Wall yesterday:

“Some say he [Zakir Naik] is a good debator and converted non-Muslims into Islam. Unfortunately, oratory skill does not impress us. One aspiring Prime Minister had great oratorial skill.

“It goes back to the characteristic of preachers or pendakwah. A pendakwah should have three important qualities; ilmu (knowledge), amal (application of ilmu) and adab (proper and exemplary conduct).

“Zakir – pix below – serves a certain purpose but may not be exemplary for Malaysia.”

Zakir Naik

Zakir’s “combative style of debate is the wrong orientation for M’sia” — A Voice

Blogger ‘A Voice’ also believes that it is not important to argue over the controversial pendakwah, saying Zakir Naik could be just “another celebrity preacher which usually does not add much to existing body of knowledge”.

Explaining his stance on the issue, A Voice said:

“We have been living in peace and harmony with great tolerance for various races and religions.

“By right, Malaysian Muslims should stop bringing such preachers from India and Indonesia but instead be preaching to these countries how to live in peace and harmony.

“Zakir Naik comes from a country with long history of clashes between different faiths and races. His combative style of debate is the wrong orientation for Malaysia.”

“Off course, we expect to get criticised from fellow Muslims for saying so.”

Pastor Niemoller knew his flock well

Thus far, we’ve heard a thunderous silence from the usually vocal and articulate Christian community with regard to the Zakir Nailk controversy. It has been only Indian Hindus and a sprinkling of Malays speaking up.

So much for the love-love-love that the Christians constantly profess for their Bangsa Malaysia ‘brothers and sisters’.


List of political parties, leaders, organizations and public figures who are FOR & AGAINST the staging of Zakir Naik’s talk — click HERE


Zakir Naik does comparative religion and discusses Hinduism. His Muslim audience listen to him compare Islam and other religions.

The Christians in Malaysia are fine with this as long as it is the Hindu deities that the preacher is disparaging.

If the Christians do not find Zakir Naik’s approach to be objectionable, then the rest of us should not find the forums discussing the Christianization threat objectionable either.

screamINwall

A Voice: “Anyway wattaheck, let’s not be hypocritical”

Henceforth, Christians in Malaysia have no further cause to complain when the next seminar or forum rolls around warning Malays about the threat of Christianization.

A Voice notes that with the exception of Buddhists, adherents of the other faiths will naturally try to spread their religion to non-believers.

“To Christians, propagating Christianity is a cardinal duty. Guess it is same of all other faith, Muslims included, to propagate God’s message. Each faith’s version of God’s message, off course,” observes A Voice.

Both sides know the name of the game.

“Why should they [Christians] be upset of Muslims discussing among themselves of this threat?”, he asks.

Looking at the current development, A Voice arrives at a logical conclusion, “So the Christians should not be offended about the close-door session to Muslims at UiTM about Christian threat”.

A Voice’s full blog entry can be read @ http://anotherbrickinwall.blogspot.my/2016/04/more-important-let-zakar-and-zikir-naik.html

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Porky Fries. Tags: .

Lesson for Indians from Zakir Naik controversy How many YBs from DAP are affiliated with City Harvest and other evangelical churches?

18 Comments Add your own

  • 1. mohd salim  |  April 13, 2016 at 8:45 am

    Exactly. Hopefully this will open the doors to other Muslim preachers who will do the same to Christianity!

    Reply
    • 2. Gaman logiut  |  April 13, 2016 at 11:10 pm

      What an idiot

      Reply
  • 3. I am Woman  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:02 am

    What i have learned from this Zakir Naik storm (in a tea cup) is that interfaith discussions are welcomed by non Muslims and comparative discussions are destructive.

    The Muslims and Christians are the most sensitive about their religions. So to mohd salim your comment above I find distasteful. It’s one thing to defend your religion when under extreme provocation, it’s totally unacceptable to start a religious war.

    Reply
    • 4. mohd salim  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:23 am

      I am just echoing Helen’s point. That IF, in the future there should be a similar situation that affected Christians, they can no longer say anything. And if they do, we can call them hypocrites.

      Reply
  • 5. Phobia  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:17 am

    One day, the Chinese are accused of meddling, the next of not participating. Mostly the Chinese are accused of meddling but now that they are not doing anything, its wrong. From my perspective, its a civil liberty issue. If he isn’t calling for killings and such matters, then let him talk lah. If you don’t like what he’s saying I suggest you bring in speakers who you admire, and attend those talks. I personally would love to hear from former religious nut-jobs who learned to just enjoy the culture but don’t take things literally in a fundamentalist style.
    There’s a Taoist quote: ” If the fool is not laughing at the Tao, its not the Tao”.

    Reply
    • 6. Helen Ang  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:42 am

      re: “One day, the Chinese are accused of meddling, the next of not participating. Mostly the Chinese are accused of meddling but now that they are not doing anything, its wrong.”

      The comparison is with Christians. The Hindus are upset about Zakir Naik’s talk. The Christians are upset about the seminar held at UiTM.

      re: “From my perspective, it’s a civil liberty issue. If he isn’t calling for killings and such matters, then let him talk lah.”

      There was a fire bomb thrown at Penang DCM (II) Ramasamy’s office. IGP has reservations about public order.

      re: “If you don’t like what he’s saying I suggest you bring in speakers who you admire, and attend those talks.”

      (a) Bringing in counter speakers (if they’re allowed by gomen) would only perpetuate the vicious circle, and in any case disagreeing with Zakir Naik does not mean that I agree with religious ideas opposed to ZN

      (b) Attendance the talks does not guarantee opportunity for rebuttal

      re: “I personally would love to hear from former religious nut-jobs who learned to just enjoy the culture but don’t take things literally in a fundamentalist style.”

      I’d recommend the writings of Ms Boo Su-Lyn of the Malay Mail for you then.

      Reply
      • 7. Phobia  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:57 am

        At risk of contradicting myself, I do wonder about the wisdom of legitimising some type of free speech. Especially those who want to take away civil liberties and can find a receptive audience. By using free speech they can influence laws that may lead to taking away other peoples’ freedom.

        Another Taoist thought: Beware the moralizing arm-twisters!

        Reply
        • 8. Chris  |  April 13, 2016 at 1:06 pm

          Bro., Canada and Britain have banned Mr. Zakir for his Islamist exclusivism and there’s a Sunni-Shia coalition in India that’s highly concerned about his agitating Wahhabi-like attitude. I’ve listened to Zakir on YouTube; he makes a lot of sense in many places with his factual arguments, but falls short when he practices his encyclopedic reductionism on the religious psychology of human beings.

          http://www.meforum.org/5150/naik-saudi-evangelist

          Reply
    • 9. mohd salim  |  April 13, 2016 at 9:55 am

      Absolutely Phobia. Thats the point. If the Christians keep quiet, we can attack them for only looking out for themselves. If we can use this to goad them, and they start to talk, it further strengthens our case that they are anti Muslim!

      Reply
      • 10. Phobia  |  April 13, 2016 at 10:10 am

        There you have it Ms. Ang.
        For Christians, following mohd salim’s logic, this is a self preservation motion. Who is to say that this is the wrong decision?
        If i were Christian i’d be thinking about how the Malay speaking Christians struggled all by their lonesome. Other faiths also had a stake in the banned words, but it was stridently argued here that they shouldn’t meddle lest they want Sauron’s eye turned towards them.

        Reply
        • 11. Helen Ang  |  April 13, 2016 at 10:48 am

          MCA is not a Christian party whereas DAP is an evangelical party.

          Today, even the Chinese who are not Christian are staunchly supporting DAP and rejecting MCA. This is a big mistake on the part of the Chinese community who are Buddhist/Taoist/agnostic.

          There is a clash of civilizations between the Western world that used to be Christendom and the ummah. Uncle Sam and his Coalition of the Willing call it ‘War on Terror (Muslim terrorists)’.

          The anti-Islam far right is rising across Europe. See for example how a former conservative prime minister of Poland described the Muslim immigrants/Syrian refugees that his country was forced by Germany to accept, http://www.politico.eu/article/migrants-asylum-poland-kaczynski-election/

          The crusade-jihad battlefront between Christianity and Islam has been raging for more than one-and-a-half millennia.

          However, there is no religious war between Islam and Buddhism (bar the anti-immigrant sentiment of Buddhist Burmans against the Rohingya).

          It is self-defeating for the Malaysian Chinese community at large to allow themselves to be dragged into a religious war by the evangelista leadership of the DAP.

          The DAP and its political Christianity is unnecessarily embroiling Chinese in a war of attrition against the majority religious community. Even the Chinese in China are dead set against the evangelistas in their midst.

          The diaspora Chinese in Malaysia who are DAP followers are a aberration from the 1.2 billion mainstream Han Chinese in our local support for the DAP evangelistas.

          Reply
          • 12. mohd salim  |  April 13, 2016 at 11:02 am

            Don’t forget the Buddhist priests in Sri Lanka who were persecuting the Muslims.
            But Helen is right. If the Chinese lay low, don’t talk about equality, don’t question Ketuanan Melayu and the supremacy of Islam, all will be well.
            Do not be fooled by the delusionals who sell some silly idea of equality. It’s in the constitution. Bumiputeras have special rights and Islam is the religion of the Federation.
            Work, pay your taxes and do not question anything to do with Bumiputeras or Islam – for that you get citizenship. This was the deal but the current Chinese and some other pendatangs are buta sejarah. You can see their disease creeping in with the Hindus as well with the two Indian ladies who were trying to take on the Syariah court ruling. It was a nice slap on their faces when the IGP chose to ignore the court order to locate the child.

            Reply
            • 13. Mr Money  |  April 13, 2016 at 2:24 pm

              Sack you melayus from our businesses. Let you go pancing ikan

              Reply
          • 14. Keris  |  April 13, 2016 at 11:33 am

            RE: “There is a clash of civilizations between the Western world that used to be Christendom and the ummah. Uncle Sam and his Coalition of the Willing call it ‘War on Terror (Muslim terrorists)’.
            The anti-Islam far right is rising across Europe. See for example how a former conservative prime minister of Poland described the Muslim immigrants/Syrian refugees that his country was forced by Germany to accept, http://www.politico.eu/article/migrants-asylum-poland-kaczynski-election/ The crusade-jihad battlefront between Christianity and Islam has been raging for more than one-and-a-half millennia.”

            Kak Helen, to provide the contemporary background to the bloody schism within our Muslim ranks, the following is a summary to “Open Letter to al-Baghdadi (ISIS)” undersigned by the most judicious Islamic scholars around the world:

            (1) It is forbidden in Islam to issue fatwas without all the necessary learning requirements. Even then fatwas must follow Islamic legal theory as defined in the Classical texts. It is also forbidden to cite a portion of a verse from the Qur’an—or part of a verse—to derive a ruling without looking at everything that the Qur’an and Hadith teach related to that matter. In other words, there are strict subjective and objective prerequisites for fatwas , and one cannot ‘cherry-pick’ Qur’anic verses for legal arguments without considering the entire Qur’an and Hadith .
            (2) It is forbidden in Islam to issue legal rulings about anything without mastery of the Arabic language.
            (3) It is forbidden in Islam to oversimplify Shari’ah matters and ignore established Islamic sciences.
            (4) It is permissible in Islam [for scholars] to differ on any matter, except those fundamentals of religion that all Muslims must know.
            (5) It is forbidden in Islam to ignore the reality of contemporary times when deriving legal rulings.

            (6) It is forbidden in Islam to kill the innocent.
            (7) It is forbidden in Islam to kill emissaries, ambassadors, and diplomats; hence it is forbidden to kill journalists and aid workers.
            (8) Jihad in Islam is defensive war. It is not permissible without the right cause, the right purpose and without the right rules of conduct.
            (9) It is forbidden in Islam to declare people non-Muslim unless he (or she) openly declares disbelief.
            (10) It is forbidden in Islam to harm or mistreat—in any way—Christians or any ‘People of the Scripture’.

            (11) It is obligatory to consider Yazidis as People of the Scripture.
            (12) The re-introduction of slavery is forbidden in Islam. It was abolished by universal consensus.
            (13) It is forbidden in Islam to force people to convert.
            (14) It is forbidden in Islam to deny women their rights.
            (15) It is forbidden in Islam to deny children their rights.

            (16) It is forbidden in Islam to enact legal punishments (hudud) without following the correct procedures that ensure justice and mercy.
            (17) It is forbidden in Islam to torture people.
            (18) It is forbidden in Islam to disfigure the dead.
            (19) It is forbidden in Islam to attribute evil acts to God ﷻ.
            (20) It is forbidden in Islam to destroy the graves and shrines of Prophets and Companions.

            (21) Armed insurrection is forbidden in Islam for any reason other than clear disbelief by the ruler and not allowing people to pray.
            (22) It is forbidden in Islam to declare a caliphate without consensus from all Muslims.
            (23) Loyalty to one’s nation is permissible in Islam.
            (24) After the death of the Prophet ﷺ , Islam does not require anyone to emigrate anywhere.

            Reply
    • 15. Kung  |  April 13, 2016 at 3:02 pm

      Hahaha I don’t know how to say it …..

      Master Hui Neng 6th patriarch of Zen school gave instruction:
      “What did your original face look like before you were born?”

      Look into your true nature

      Reply
  • 16. Orang Perlis  |  April 13, 2016 at 10:13 am

    tapi sebenarnya A Voice hentam Muslims yg taksub sgt dgn Zakir ( the way i read it…)

    Reply
  • 17. lemac  |  April 13, 2016 at 11:30 am

    The truth hurts and to A Voice……which part or parts in Dr. ZAKIR NAIK lectures that hurt him which he did not eloborate specifically.

    DZN departs his knowledge on comparative religion studies and shows the truth path. The choice is left to the participants who attended his lectures. Those who attended his lectures comprised people of all religions, atheists and of various walks of life and professions.

    Reply
    • 18. mohd salim  |  April 13, 2016 at 11:48 am

      I think ABITW said it best and I quote, “Keling being Keling”…..

      Reply

Dijemput memberi komen anda

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


My blog, my like

Helen Ang

Recent Posts

Kalender

April 2016
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Pengunjung

  • 7,478,184 hits

Archives

Feeds


%d bloggers like this: